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louisstephens

Sending ajax data from multiple page to one template

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So I have a project where multiple pages are sending POST data to 1 single template page.  All was working well (well, at least with one ajax post), but now I have hit a stumbling block. I figured  the "best" way to handle the request were to use url segments and then use the following in the status page:

if ($config->ajax && $input->urlSegment1 == 'add-bookmark') {
// some code here
}

However, this doesnt seem to really work (as I assume the the request isnt being posted to /status/ but rather to /status/add-bookmark/). What is the best way to actually handle this?

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have you tried logging the POST request to both the URL and the URL with the Segment - it should be the same unless somehow URL segments are not activated on that template. The idea should work, I can't think of any reason why segments would not work on an ajax service page; if you keep hitting up against issues you could go for query parameters instead.

You may also need to check if there is a URL segment present, like if(strlen($input-urlSegment etc.. ; and make sure to also do the regular sanitization of the $input, as well as return 404 for unused segments...

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Thanks Macrura for the help. To be honest, I am still wrapping my head around ajax, so I completely overlooked logging the POST requests etc. As it turns out, I had a "wonderful" typo in my code, and forgot the "()" on $page->save() that was causing the issue. 

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    • By MoritzLost
      In this tutorial I want to write about handling special cases and change requests by clients gracefully without introducing code bloat or degrading code quality and maintainability. I'll use a site's navigation menu as an example, as it's relatable and pretty much every site has one. I'll give some examples of real situations and change requests I encountered during projects, and describe multiple approaches to handling them. However, this post is also about the general mindset I find useful for ProcessWire development, which is more about how to handle special cases and still keep your code clean by making the special case a normal one.
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