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Twig_Loader_Filesystem Not Found

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My site works very well until today I fill a bunch of multilanguage fields than suddenly it start to this.

I can't reach any page, everything gives 500 error.

and log is:

2017-07-12 09:33:56    guest   Error:     Class 'Twig_Loader_Filesystem' not found (line 338 of /home/petform/public_html/site/modules/TemplateTwigReplace/TemplateTwigReplace.module)

How can I fix this?
 

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