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jacmaes

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jacmaes last won the day on June 28 2017

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About jacmaes

  • Birthday 10/05/1973

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    Seville, Spain

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  1. I always watch carefully your videos. You've put so much thought into it, it really shows how you've found the advantages and drawbacks of each solution. I also started experimenting with the first option where you basically need to set up the container, rows and columns first before working on your content. Template-wise, I figured that tracking depth could get complicated quickly, and I abandoned the idea, but it sure looks like the most flexible, less "hacky" way compared the new, third option you're proposing. Sure, it requires thinking about design first before inputting your content, and I'm not sure I would offer that option to most of my clients as it requires some learning and a designer/developer frame of mind ("what's the deal about those rows and container anyway?" is what I'd imagine they'd say), but if I'm the sole editor, I'll love to have that option! The classic option is of course always a good, although obviously more limited option, that is intuitive and supported out of the box without some clever hack and double modals such as the new, hybrid approach. I can't shake the feeling that the third option is going to be brittle and need an ever-growing set of workarounds for all the use cases out there. Personally, I've gone a different route. That's probably going to sound half-baked to you, but it might be of interest to some. Instead of trying to cram all the blocks on the same page, I'm using subpages as containers for those blocks. In other words, from the parent page, I loop through all the children to build my page out of this series of containers / sections. So each child page is basically a section of the parent page, where I only need to apply columns, then place my blocks inside. If I need to change the order of those sections, it's just a drag and drop away: I simply move the child page up or down below the parent page. I've not fully explored the possibility, and I'm still experimenting with this on a couple of sites, but I've found it flexible enough for most of my uses, and easy to code. On each child page, first there's a combo (pro) field that holds the basic design settings for the current section, such as margin, padding, background color, width, etc. Then I set up my columns with a simple text field that holds predefined tags for responsive widths and optionally offsets and additional classes, and inside my blocks. Here's a screenshot (in Spanish, sorry) of something very similar to what you've shown in your video: a text on the left, and image on the right.
  2. This whole discussion points to a larger issue: There is no way to visually select a page you want to link to in another language (without diving into the source code or manually editing the link), is there? A simple use case is for a client to be able to link to a page in another language from a CKeditor field. I have to admit that I've never had the need so far in the 9+ years I've been using PW, but it seems like it should be an option, even if it's hidden by default. What do you guys think?
  3. Thanks @teppo for pointing me to that bug report. It looks like it's the same issue indeed. I'll add a comment to that issue. Edit: done.
  4. I have to manually enter the link in the source code, as choosing it from the link dialog in CKEditor points to the page in the same language. So as @wbmnfktr says, it's no use for a non-developer. Edit: Just to clarify, before turning off "Link abstraction", I could edit the link manually to point to another language and the changes were correctly saved, but it always redirected me the current language when clicking on the link on the front-end. Now at least there's a workaround, even if it's not client-friendly at all. There should be a visual way to select other languages in the tree.
  5. @monollonom Good thinking, it now works if "Link abstraction" is turned off! Thanks! Too bad I have to relinquish that function though, it comes very handy most of the time.
  6. I've thought about using HannaCode too but it seems like too much overhead and work, especially if I'm not already using it and just need to implement it for this purpose. I just want to link to a page in another language, this is such a simple request that shouldn't require that type of workaround. Plus imagine explaining that to a client: "if you want to link to a page in another language on your site, a simple link like you're used to won't work, you need to insert this HannaCode snippet that…" 🤯
  7. @wbmnfktr thanks for your answer. So we're stuck in a loop and can't break out of the currently selected language it seems.
  8. I'm stumbling into the same issue. I can't believe I haven't run into this before. My site is in Spanish by default, with English as a second language. On one of the pages, the English translation is not available, so my client just wants to link to the default Spanish page with a message in CKEditor that says something like "Please view the Spanish version of this page to learn more about…". But when I try to link to the Spanish version, I always end up on the English version, even if I change the link manually in the source code. Does anybody know any workaround?
  9. Full docs here: https://processwire.com/docs/front-end/output/markup-regions/
  10. @alexm Thanks for sorting this out. I've just run into the exact same thing, with "marzo" (March in Spanish) as this is my locale. Could you please file a Github issue?
  11. @jploch, could you explain what each icon in the sidebar does? You demonstrate a headline, a video and some images in your video, but what else is available?
  12. This is impressive and fulfills a lot of requirements I am looking for this type of page builder. I particularly like the use of blocks as pages (maintaining the PW flexibility to reference these blocks from other pages), that styles are saved separately in JSON and a stylesheet in generated for each page (which you can check in the source code of your example), and above all the use of CSS grids that allow much more complex and visually interesting layouts. I wouldn't let my clients touch this kind of interface unless they're design-savvy, so I'm glad that design features can be disabled for certain roles. Congrats!
  13. CloudFlare has just launched a privacy-respecting analytics solution that is basic but free: https://www.cloudflare.com/web-analytics/ Great site, congrats!
  14. This Mac app, Blocs, that defines itself as Website Builder, might also be of interest: https://blocsapp.com/
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