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  1. This week we have a new master/main version released after a full year in the making. With nearly 40 pull requests, hundreds of new additions and more than 100 issue reports resolved, this new version has a ton of great new stuff and we’ll cover most of the new stuff here— https://processwire.com/blog/posts/pw-3.0.184-master/
    48 points
  2. This new main/master version has more than 220 commits, resolves more than 80 issues, adds numerous new features, performance improvements and optimizations, and consumes HALF the disk space of our previous release— https://processwire.com/blog/posts/pw-3.0.200/ I've just merged the dev branch to the master branch so this new version is available now. I will add the 3.0.200 tag (which should trigger packagist and others) over this weekend or Monday.
    40 points
  3. Happy New Year! Hope that you all have a great end to 2021 and start of 2022. No major core updates to report this week, just a few minor issue fixing commits, so no version bump today. The dev branch is getting close to 100 commits (and at 7 versions) above the master branch, and with even more improvements/fixes/optimizations than that. So we may try to get a new master/main version out in early 2022, as I'd really like to get more master versions out in 2022 than we did in 2021. Some portion of our audience does not use the dev branch where most of the activity happens, and so it might be nice to share more of that activity on the master/main branch. That's one of many things I'm thinking about as the New Year approaches and am certain 2022 is going to be a great year for ProcessWire and the community. Hope that you have a great weekend and Happy New Year!
    38 points
  4. ProcessWire 3.0.197 resolves 9 issue reports and adds 3 feature requests. For details in resolved issues and feature requests, be sure to see the commit log. I'll cover a couple of my favorite feature requests that have been added this week: New $files->getCSV() method This comes by way of feature request #400 via @bernhard to add something to abstract away the redundant details of reading a CSV file into one simple method call. This simplifies the reading of a CSV file by abstracting file-open, get-header, get-rows and file-close operations into a single method call, where all those operations are handled internally. All you have to do is keep calling the $files->getCSV($filename) method until it returns false. This method will also skip over blank rows by default, unlike PHP’s fgetcsv() which will return a 1-column row with null value. Here's how you use it: Let's say we have this CSV file (first row is the header): Food,Type,Color Apple,Fruit,Red Banana,Fruit,Yellow Spinach,Vegetable,Green Here's how you'd use the new method: while($row = $files->getCSV('/path/to/foods.csv')) { echo "Food: $row[Food] "; echo "Type: $row[Type] "; echo "Color: $row[Color] "; } There are also several $options supported, see the $files->getCSV() documentation page for more. There's also a new $files->getAllCSV() method that does the same thing but returns all the rows in the CSV file in one call. Improvement to InputfieldPageListSelectMultiple Next was feature request #339 that requested adding the enhancement developed by @Robin S (via the PageListSelectMultipleQuickly module) into the core. This enhancement keeps the selectable page list open for multiple selections rather than closing it for each selection. It also better indicates when an item is selected. While I ended up writing it in a different way than Robin S.'s module, the end result is nearly identical to Robin S.'s short GIF screencast below: Also added this week is a new "visibility" option for Inputfields: Open + Locked (not editable), along with some small hook documentation improvements in the Pages class. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    34 points
  5. This week we have some great performance and scalability improvements in the core that enable lazy-loading of fields, templates and fieldgroups, thanks to @thetuningspoon — https://processwire.com/blog/posts/field-and-template-scalability-improvements/
    32 points
  6. This week we've had a mixture of core updates and more work on the PageAutosave/LivePreview module. In the core we have mostly maintenance updates and issue resolutions. I'm not going to bump the version number this week as I'd like to get a bit more added to this version first. One feature request that appears in the core this week is the ability to specify colors for RepeaterMatrix item types (idea from @Ivan Gretsky). If you have any version of RepeaterMatrix and you use the current core dev branch, you can specify the background color for any repeater item type by placing a color hex code in the repeater type label (like at the end of it, but wherever). For instance, typing in #777777 (or just #777) would make the repeater items of that type have a grey background rather than the default color background. Though whatever color you choose, note that the text color is white, so don't choose too light of a color. (The hex color code is of course removed from the item labels.) The PageAutosave and LivePreview module also got several updates this week, bringing it that much closer to being production ready: Added support for automatic detection of best placement for live preview window position based on available space. It will choose the correct location and size either to the right, left, above or below your page editor window. Added support for remembering live preview window position in a cookie. So if you setup your preferred layout for editor window and live preview window, ProcessWire will continue to use it. Added a new option to support automatic replacement of individual page field values without having to add your own `pw-value-*` classes. Meaning, you can now gain the benefit of field-value updates in your live preview without PW having to re-render the page. This applies primarily to text-based fields (title, body, etc.) that are part of the page being viewed. LivePreview editor and preview windows now talk to each other with JS rather than use SSE/streaming. I found that it just works more reliably that way, puts less load on the server, and [to my surprise] also seems to be faster. The SSE option is still there in the module config, but it's no longer the default. The only time where I think SSE might be preferable is if you want to monitor changes made to the page from outside of the page editor (like from the API) in a live preview fashion, as the SSE option will pick those up too. In addition to the above, numerous minor bug fixes, improvements and optimizations were added. If you want to grab this new version (which is still a development/testing version), it's posted in the ProDrafts, ProDevTools and ProFields boards. There's more to cover with this module still. I've been so focused on it that I haven't yet started working with htmx. Though I did spend quite a bit of time in the docs and it looks amazing. From what I understand as it relates to this module, htmx could bring a lot of greatness to the front-end preview window, so I'm anxious to get into that, and even more excited to explore the possibilities it opens elsewhere in ProcessWire. Also, how awesome is it that the author of htmx stopped by to say hello and answer questions here in the forums, that made my day — big thanks to @totally not an htmx shill for joining the discussion, I hope I'll have some good questions before long too. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    32 points
  7. I agree it is unfair to make comparisons like this. I also don't think it's very nice to come to an open source project's support board and try to convince people to use a commercial CMS. Maybe the fact that a comparison can be made at all is a compliment. But Craft is a big commercial project with a sizable team and lots of resources and money behind it. ProcessWire is the opposite of that and the comparison seems inappropriate. But since you've stated this is a comparison, I'm not sure where the comparison is — you've focused exclusively on what you think Craft does better (by your own preference), but haven't made efforts to point out the areas where PW does better. So it comes across a little bit as an advertorial for large commercial CMS at the expense of a small open source project. Throughout you are stating a preference for something in Craft and claim a similar feature in ProcessWire is "not well thought out." This is wrong. A more honest statement would be that you and I clearly have different preferences, or maybe you don't fully understand something. But that does not mean that something that differs from your preferences or understanding is "not well thought out." I would never commit something to the core that hasn't been really well thought out, that's something I take really seriously. While much of Craft doesn't suit my own (and others) preferences, and may not be "well thought out" according to how I think things should work, I'm not going to join their forum and tell them it's not well thought out. That's because I respect them and trust that it's well thought out, according to their needs and preferences. So when you start telling someone that something they've put a lot of work into isn't well thought out, that's akin to saying that you do not respect them. I make no claims about being perfect at anything, and there is room for improvement in everything. What I take issue with here are the broad, subjective and largely false generalizations, and that's what I'm replying to. I'm also concerned that anywhere that you've quoted me, you've taken a statement by me out of context, extrapolating it as proof for an unrelated conclusion you've made. For example: In that link we are not talking about ProcessWire at all, and instead are talking about the processwire.com website in development, NOT the CMS. Why would you say I'm "opposed to the idea" of accessible development? This is something I'm interested in and passionate about. I don't understand why you are quoting me on one thing and saying another. In that link, I'm writing about a module called ProcessUser and something that is imposed upon it for a specific security purpose, unique to that particular module, and no other. But you have used my statement as proof that building custom features in ProcessWire isn't encouraged or supported. Nothing could be further from the truth. I have never had such a thought. My thoughts and intentions would be exactly the opposite. What you consider an advantage, I consider a major disadvantage. PW puts nothing between you and PHP, by design, that's a major advantage. I certainly would not be happy with Twig integration being a default. Clearly you like using Twig, which is fine for you to have that opinion, and I think it's perfectly fine for Twig to be an option. But I definitely wouldn't want to standardize upon it. Maybe it doesn't suit your preference, but I hope you can appreciate why we don't do things like that in PW. You are comparing two different kinds of caches. You are talking about a template engine cache. In PW there is no template engine, so likewise no template engine cache. Most of the time you would never need such a cache in PW at all. The $cache variable is something different, and while it can also cache markup, it is much more simple than you imply. PW's API is not string-based. You are writing about selectors (and specifically selector strings), not the "API". ProcessWire lets you specify selectors as strings or as arrays. Most prefer to use strings due to the simplicity of it. But this does not mean that arrays are not reliable. And if you use arrays, then there's no need to do value sanitization. But the majority of the time you are using selectors, you are not injecting user input into it either, so I would consider selector strings to be a major advantage for PW the vast majority of the time. And for times that it's not, you don't have to use it. The problem with chaining methods for this is that they are live code, you can't store them. Perhaps it has benefits in Craft, but they would not be appropriate for PW. In PW selectors can be specified as arrays or strings, and in cases where you want to separate the query property from the query value, then that's why we have the array option in PW. And yes, they are reliable, despite your claim that they are not. The same is true in PW. Fieldtypes build the query and sanitize/validate the value to be queried. The only thing PW asks you to do is IF you are using a selector "string" that ALSO happens to contain user input, then just sanitize that user input part with the selectorValue() method. If you are using an array, then such sanitization is already done for you. This has nothing to do with details of a fieldtype, which will do its own validation/sanitization. Saying "clunky" is a subjective and hardly fair statement to make. What might be clunky to you is optimal to others. You are writing specifically about the file translation system, so the whole purpose is to provide an interface to translate your site php files (primarily template files). The interface is geared to focus on that task only, and that's the point of it. I understand you value more layers between things (like with Twig), but I always prefer fewer layers, a more direct approach, so you'll see that throughout PW. If I'm using a file translation system, I want to know what file I'm working with and I want to be able to tell the translator what file to work with. That my preference, and I understand you have a different one. Of course you can, that's who it is for. Yes they are grouped by file, and that's how I prefer it, and I have never had a client have a problem with that. If you have some preference to keep translators/clients out of the admin, you can also ask them to translate from a spreadsheet (exported from PW) and PW will happily read that in and use it. None of those 3 statements is true. Translations may be stored in JSON files, but they can be exported/imported (all files at once) to/from CSV files. Translation files are not stored in "random" locations. They are stored with the language's files, which is a static location identified by its ID. Adding translations in the code editor is not impossible, because where else would you add new translations, if not in the code? If you need a new translation, go ahead and add your __('text') in your code, and it immediately becomes available as a translation. You are welcome to your opinion, but as someone that put a lot of thought and effort into field translations, it's hard for me to take your opinions seriously when you state things like this. Nothing about them is "tacked on" or "not well thought out", quite the opposite. So to me it seems like at worst, you don't understand what you are talking about, or at best (and most likely), you just have an alternate preference. This is fine, but I don't think that's obvious to everyone reading. So please don't make statements like "not well thought out" when you really mean that something doesn't suit your preference, or maybe you don't fully understand it. I appreciate examples but I'm not aware of any field where you need to "add the second language's field manually". This does not sound at all like PW multi-language fields. If you are talking about PW at all, perhaps you are talking about the "language alternate" fields option? If so, this is an option that is there to provide additional flexibility for specific cases, but it is almost never used in my experience. Please don't use it as a foundation for any comparison, as its borderline deprecated at this point and I don't expect many will ever use it. This conclusion is the opposite of the truth. The fact that PW doesn't impose a specific framework upon you means that all options are open. Anything is available to you. It is more open, not less open. It's you and PHP, and anything you can run in PHP you can run in PW. ProcessWire feature approach is built around constant improvement. It is driven by the community and the needs of clients. The development of PW has always followed this approach. I have a job working with clients just like most PW users and so I develop according to what's needed and when. Most of my income comes from client work. I work on the PW core for free, so development usually has to have some crossover with the other projects that I work on. Despite being open source and largely unfunded, the fact that PW and Craft can end up with apparently similar capabilities and feature sets—and the fact that they can be compared at all—I would consider to be a sign of efficiency and that we are doing something right. If you consider our approach "chaotic" then fine, but the accurate terms would be "flexible", "sustainable", "consistent" and "continuous". The approach been very successful for PW as a project. And PW is also one of the longest lasting projects in this area (open source or commercial), and will continue to be because it's not built around money. I don't add features without completely thinking them out. That's silly, why would we do that? I would never commit something to the core that has not been well thought out. I don't understand why you would say this unless you just don't understand it. Nothing committed in the core has been abandoned. Elsewhere, I've abandoned a ton of code, but most of it has never been seen by anyone. When I commit something to the core, I've spent a lot of time working on it and I'm also committing to supporting it, long term, for as long as there is value in it. That's another reason why I take a lot of time to think through anything that gets added. You are welcome to say that you have a different preference, and you can I clearly have different preferences, but please do not suggest something is not well thought out because that is not true. Well, I'm glad you think there are "hundreds" of features that look cool... though not well supported? I don't know what we're talking about. False. The only bugs that don't get fixed are those where they cannot be duplicated, or that don't have a clear solution and seem to be isolated to one person. And I don't know what you mean about "don't work well with each other and so on". ProcessWire's core focus is already a limited feature set, where much is left to modules. The aim is to have everything you might "need" and do it really well, but save things you might "want" for modules. This is one area where it certainly does help to have a big commercial company behind it, with full time documentation writers and such. While they do have a structure and hierarchy, I understand it may not be exactly the way everyone might want it. The site search engine is actually quite powerful and searches the API and all documentation pages, so I recommend that when you want to find something specific. This is fair, and it'll continue to be that way, the blog posts can do heavy lifting in between the time that features are added and documentation is updated (as does this forum). The blog posts do also end up as the linked documentation for features in some cases. I'm okay with it. I understand that if we were a big company it might be odd though. I don't put efforts towards pretending that PW is a big company, I work within the resources we have, putting most of it towards where it counts and less of it towards pleasing critics. The aim is that all versions are compatible, meaning you can safely upgrade from any older version to any newer version. I don't know of any other projects that do this as well as PW, so I would consider it a major benefit. If we get to the point where this is regularly not the case, then we likely would adopt semantic versioning. But the need isn't there at this point in time. Close, but not totally accurate. New versions are currently aimed at a group of new related features or a group of issue fixes. The version number goes into systems that prompt people to upgrade, at the time it is appropriate to do so. They are also for documentation purposes so that we can easily reference them in "since" statements. Lastly, it's useful to have version numbers to reference in blog and/or forum posts. Currently this system of version numbers is the most beneficial one for this project. This isn't what I'd consider a breaking change. This is something where it just asks you to install a module as part of an upgrade to the version, it doesn't break the API or the site, just locks down a specific admin feature for security until you install the appropriate module. And security always comes first in PW. But I don't think there are any actual breaking changes in PW. Again, if it became commonplace like it is in other projects, then we'd likely adopt the same version number approach they do. So perhaps that's something that will come in the future, but we're not at that point. I'm open to it at the appropriate time. A "template file" is a "file" for a "template". I don't know how to be any more clear than that. But yes there are instances where we're talking about template files that I might use the term "template" rather than "template file" since the context is established. I agree that terms like "template" and "file" are fairly generic, and it would be nice if templates were like cars where we could refer to the "car" but also have a label like "wheels" and know we are still referring to the bigger "car" above it. But "file" is a generic enough term that while accurate, needs context. I'll take it as a compliment that you consider RepeaterMatrix to be so valuable. The Pro modules were never intended to be "required" for any site. They are meant to be a luxury or a time saver, but there's nothing you can do with any Pro module that you can't do yourself by some other means. Though Pro modules might save you time in doing it. I've built example modules that show you how to do do just about anything that Pro modules can do, they just might require more of your effort. The original intention for Fieldtypes and Inputfields was that everyone would build their own according to their needs, but I don't know many that do that other than me. Have a look at FieldtypeEvents sometime to see how simple it is to do. I don't share your opinion on this. If you are of the mindset that the page tree reflects the front-end site 1-to-1 then you are in the mindset of a different system. I consider the tree to be essential, a major benefit, as you know everything has a place and hierarchy and you don't have to have various different kinds of navigations or buckets to find them. If you know one thing you know everything in PW. I've never been a fan of different bucket systems and the ambiguity that they introduce. ProcessWire was designed from the beginning to get away from what you are talking about, what I subjectively feel is a mess in other systems (again, my preference). PW aims to be simpler and more flexible than that, though pages can still be browsed as a tree or as buckets, even if the tree is the source. I don't agree with your premise, or the linked post. Having a link to someone else's opinion does not make it right, maybe just right for you personally, that's fine. I would agree that there are benefits to letting the page tree influence your navigation, but there aren't drawbacks to not using it that way either. It may have started that way. While I am currently the gatekeeper in terms of maintaining the core I consider ProcessWire to be a long term community developed project, and it becomes more that every year. Every open source project needs someone to start it, and someone to be a caretaker, ensuring the quality of it, and I see that as my role, which I take very seriously. But this is a team project and one that is much more sustainable long term than a commercial one.
    31 points
  8. This week the dev branch contains about a dozen issue fixes relative to this time last week. (commit log) While these are all relatively minor things, some have been around awhile and it's always nice to get them figured out. Plus it's often a good opportunity to iterate and improve upon related things in the process. While I think we're very close to being ready to merge to the master branch, I'm going to give it a few more days just in case. I want to make sure no new issues arise (no matter how small) as a result of all the commits we've been doing over the last few weeks with GitHub issue resolutions. Most likely there won't be many more commits on the dev branch before the merge, and perhaps by this time next week, we'll have version 3.0.184 as our next master version. Following that, I'll write up a post that documents everything new relative to the previous master version 3.0.165, as there has been quite a lot! But if you want to upgrade now, I do think there's very little risk in upgrading existing master/main installs to the current dev branch, as it is quite stable at this point, in my experience. Thank you for all of your help in testing and/or reporting issues. Have a great weekend!
    31 points
  9. This is a holiday week here in the US, at least for my kids (school break). With kids home I've been off work this week so don't have any ProcessWire updates to report, but I'm looking forward to getting back to work next week and will have more updates to report then. Yesterday was Thanksgiving here in the the US and that kind of marks the beginning of the holiday season here. So today the Christmas tree went up, the lights are coming out and the holiday music has taken over the radio (or Alexa or Google or whatever we call it). Cheers and Happy Holidays!
    30 points
  10. This week I've been focusing on the dev branch and some low level code optimization, especially as it relates to the PW boot process, translating URLs to pages and identifying the page, language, URL segments, page numbers, etc. from the request URL. I'm breaking down much of the logic (currently in the ProcessPageView module) into more focused parts that can become part of PW's $pages API, increasing reusability of related code. (Don't worry, this won't affect any existing hooks). At the same time, I'm looking for opportunities for optimization and performance improvement, and have already found a few. For instance, the LanguageSupportPageNames module introduces overhead into some page finding operations and there's good improvement potential there, among others. I'm pretty much still in the middle of it all though, so am going to hold off on committing any of this to the dev branch until it's further along. But since we've got a quiet commit log this week, I just wanted to keep you up-to-date. Hopefully some of these fairly significant updates will be stable enough to commit to the dev branch next week. By the way, these updates will also enable the SessionAllow module (from last week) to be configurable by page, as PW will now identify the requested page before starting the session. More soon. Have a great weekend!
    30 points
  11. While the version remains at 3.0.181 this week, there have been several core updates committed to the dev branch containing a mixture of issue fixes, new features, core optimizations and upgrades. This is likely to continue for another minor version or two while we prepare for our next master branch release. The most visible improvements this week can be found in ProcessField and ProcessTemplate (aka Setup > Fields, Setup > Templates). The main list of fields (Setup > Fields) has been improved with some new supported icon indicators that now identify fields that have template overrides/context settings, among others. All of the existing icon indicators have also been updated with contextual links so that clicking them takes you to the relevant part in the template editor. My favorite update here though is that the "Type" column in the fields list now indicates the Inputfield type in cases where it matters. For instance, rather than saying "Textarea" for the "body" field, it now says "Textarea/CKEditor". Likewise, Page and Options fields indicate what kind of input is used (i.e. "Page/AsmSelect" or "Options/Checkboxes"), as do some other types. Clicking on the "Templates" quantity now takes you to the "Add/remove from templates" field, rather than just showing you a list of templates. Similar updates were made to the ProcessTemplate main list of templates (Setup > Templates) though there wasn't as much to do there. Once you are actually editing a template, the instructions on the "Basics" tab have been improved to clarify what you can do on this screen. For instance, many don't know that you can click a field name/label to edit it in context, or that you can click and drag the percent indicator to adjust the field's width in the editor, all from this tab in the template editor. Now the description outlines these features. When you select a new field to add to your template, it now reveals a note that clarifies you must save before the field becomes editable in the context of that template. These are minor updates, but combined I think they add significant clarity, especially for new users. Stepping outside of the core, I've been working quite a bit this week on the PagesSnapshots module I told you about a couple of weeks ago. It lets you save or restore snapshot versions of pages, and it doesn't have any notable limitations in terms of fields. At this stage it is working fully with repeaters, matrix repeaters, nested repeaters, Page Tables and even paginated Table fields with thousands of rows. It can restore to the original page, to a new page, or to another page of your choice. And it is very fast. Eventually ProDrafts will use its API to handle saving and publishing of draft versions. Initially I plan to release it in one or more of the existing module sets (like ProDevTools or ProDrafts or both), and longer term it may be added to the core. I've got another week or two of work to cover with it, but at this stage the API is fully functional and working well, so I'm now beginning to focus more on the Process module (user interface) side of it. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    29 points
  12. This week core updates are focused on resolving issue reports. Nearly all of the 10 commits this week resolve one issue or another. Though all are minor, so I'm not bumping the version number just yet, as I'd like to get a little more in the core before bumping the version to 3.0.202. This week I've also continued development on this WP-to-PW site conversion. On this site hundreds of pages are used to represent certain types of vacations, each with a lot of details and fields. Several pages in the site let you list, search and filter these things. When rendering a list of these (which a lot of pages do), it might list 10, 20, 100 or more of them at once on a page (which is to say, there can be a few, or there can be a lot). Each of the items has a lot of markup, compiled from about a dozen fields in each list item. They are kind of expensive to render in terms of time, so caching comes to mind. These pages aren't good candidates for full-page caches (like ProCache, etc.) since they will typically be unique according to a user's query and filters. So using the $cache API var seems like an obvious choice (or MarkupCache). But I didn't really want to spawn a new DB query for each item (as there might be hundreds), plus I had a specific need for when the cache should be reset — I needed it to re-create the cache for each rendered item whenever the cache for it was older than the last modified date of the page it represents. There's a really simple way to do this and it makes a huge difference in performance (for this case at least). Here's a quick recipe for how to make this sort of rendering very fast. But first, let's take a look at the uncached version: // find items matching query $items = $pages->find('...'); // iterate and render each item foreach($items as $item) { echo " <!-- expensive to render markup here ---> <div class='item'> <a href='$item->url'>$item->title</a> ...and so on... </div> "; } That looks simple, but what you don't see is everything that goes in the <div class="item">...</div> which is a lot more than what you see here. (If we were to take the above code literally, just outputting url and title, then there would be little point in caching.) But within each .item element more than a dozen fields are being accessed and output, including images, repeatable items, etc. It takes some time to render. When there's 100 or more of them to render at once, it literally takes 5 seconds. But after adding caching to it, now the same thing takes under 100 milliseconds. Here's the same code as above, but hundreds of times faster, thanks to a little caching: // determine where we want to store cache files for each list item $cachePath = $config->paths->cache . 'my-list-items/'; if(!is_dir($cachePath)) wireMkdir($cachePath); // find items matching query $items = $pages->find('...'); // iterate and render each item foreach($items as $item) { $file = $cachePath . "$item->id.html"; // item's cache file if(file_exists($file) && filemtime($file) > $page->modified) { // cache is newer than page's last mod time, so use the cache echo file_get_contents($file); continue; } $out = " <!-- expensive to render markup here ---> <div class='item'> <a href='$item->url'>$item->title</a> ...and so on... </div> "; echo $out; // save item to cache file so we can use it next time file_put_contents($file, $out, LOCK_EX); } This is a kind of cache that rarely needs to be completely cleared because each item in the cache stays consistent with the modification time of the page it represents. But at least during development, we'll need to occasionally clear all of the items in the cache when we make changes to the markup used for each item. So it's good to have a simple option to clear the cache. In this case, I just have it display a "clear cache" link before or after the list, and it only appears to the superuser: if($user->isSuperuser()) { if($input->get('clear')) wireRmdir($cachePath, true); echo "<a href='./?clear=1'>Clear cache</a>"; } I found this simple cache solution to be very effective and efficient on this site. I'll probably add a file() method to the $cache API var that does the same thing. But as you can see, it's hardly necessary since this sort of cache can be implemented so easily on its own, just using plain PHP file functions. Give it a try sometime if you haven't already. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    27 points
  13. The ProcessPageList module now has a configuration setting where you can select pages that should not be shown in the page list. For example, maybe once you've set up your 404 page, you don't really need it to display there anymore, except maybe in debug mode. Or maybe you don't ever need the "Admin" page to display in the page list. This new feature lets you do that, and for any page that you decide. Next, a "Usage" fields has been added to the "Basics" tab in the Field editor, just like the one in the Template editor (requested feature #445). This shows you what fields are using the template. It's essentially the same information that you'll find in the "Actions > Add or remove from templates" feature, but easier to find, especially for people newer to PW. That's all for this week, I hope you have a great weekend!
    27 points
  14. This week we have ProcessWire 3.0.201 on the dev branch which includes a couple minor fixes but also a couple of useful additions: There are new "Tab" field visibility options available for any field in the page editor. This makes the field display in its own page editor tab. It saves you from having to create a new/separate Tab field just to wrap around an existing field to make it display in a tab. So far I've found it particularly useful with ProFields (Combo, Table, Textareas, RepeaterMatrix) as well as the core Repeater, FieldsetPage and Images fields. For instance, I have a Combo field labeled "SEO" that lets me edit browser_title, meta_description, canonical_url, etc., and now I can add that field to any template and pages using that template have their own "SEO" tab. Sure you could do this before by creating a separate tab field with an "SEO" label, but now it's a lot simpler/faster, as any field can now display as a tab on its own. Like with the other visibility modes, also included are options to make the tab load dynamically on click with ajax or make the value non-editable. You can also optionally specify a label for the tab independently of the field label. This is because usually you want tab labels to be very short (1 word is best) whereas field labels have no such need. Please note that this new Tab option is exclusive to the page editor, and in order to work the field must not already be in a tab. Also added this week is a new $page->getMultiple() method. This method works the same as the $page->get() method except that it lets you retrieve multiple page property/field values at once and returns them in an array. For example: $a = $page->getMultiple([ 'foo', 'bar', 'baz' ]); list($foo, $bar, $baz) = $a; It also accepts a CSV string: $a = $page->getMultiple('foo,bar,baz'); By default it returns a regular PHP array, suitable for using in list() like the first example. But if you want it to return an associative array instead, then specify true as the 2nd argument: $a = $page->getMultiple('foo,bar,baz', true); echo $a['foo']; echo $a['bar']; echo $a['baz']; I find this method useful in reducing the amount of code/lines necessary in many cases, and most often I use it in combination with a PHP list() call, i.e. list($title,$subtitle,$body) = $page->getMultiple('title,subtitle,body'); That's all for this week. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    27 points
  15. I developed the new Geffen Playhouse website over the course of 2018/2019 and launched it in September 2019. It has been perhaps the largest project I have been involved in. The Geffen Playhouse went through an entire re-branding done by Base (including a custom font), and I worked with Teak on the new website. Website https://www.geffenplayhouse.org/ Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geffen_Playhouse Base write-up https://www.basedesign.com/work/geffen-playhouse-always-geffen-playhouse-always-new Teak SF write-up https://teaksf.com/work/geffen-playhouse-ticketing-ecommerce-website-design/ Another write-up: https://www.laurentakayama.com/geffen Their previous website was severely antiquated and it wasn't a responsive website (as of 2019!). Instead, it forwarded mobile users to a "mobile-friendly" website on a different subdomain, which I think was hosted by a third party service. However the data containing all the actors, shows, seasons, news and press articles were all in there. So one major aspect of this website was de-duping and importing their data into ProcessWire, along with some post-import cleaning… that's ~25 years of data. The site is built with UIkit 3 for the most part, and also uses FullCalendar for the large and small calendars. There is a custom integration with AudienceView, their ticketing system, which is used to import all the performance showtimes of their shows into ProcessWire. It's not the easiest API to work with (XML), but I eventually got it working. Repeater Matrix is being heavily used for section-based page building. Building out all the necessary matrix types took a long time as there was quite a bit of thinking what types and layouts we needed as we went along. However the end result has given the editors a lot of flexibility. ProCache is being used as well, including a CDN for all assets. This is crucial because when opening season sales are announced, the site gets slammed, but with caching turned on, it's not a problem anymore. On a deeper level, the site uses my new (well 2 years old now), universal and very opinionated base module that provides a menu builder, a standard set of fields/templates/pages, and a bunch of other tweaks that I tend to use on every site. All the fields, templates and pages are set up in a streamlined and editor friendly way. I wasn't able to access their previous CMS backend for various reasons (I only got the MySQL dump), so when developing the site and data model in ProcessWire, I was able to completely re-envision the editor experience and the data model without bias. A quote from one of the marketing directors at Geffen Playhouse: "We absolutely love ProcessWire."
    27 points
  16. ProcessWire 3.0.196 contains 10 minor issue fixes, but the biggest additions this week are 6 pull requests submitted from @bernhard. This most notable PR is an upgrade to AdminThemeUikit that enables greater customization of the theme's markup. If you recall, Bernhard also provided a PR last year that enables customization of the admin theme's CSS/LESS, so now he's now completed the circle and provided us with a direction for customizing the markup as well. This newest addition lets you provide your own custom render files for different parts of the admin theme by placing them in /site/templates/AdminThemeUikit/. Third party modules can also define custom render files. Furthermore, this addition adds a new hook that enables you (or your modules) to hook into and modify just about any part of the admin theme rendering. Rather than going into all the details and repeating all of the instructions here, see the new AdminThemeUikit README file "Customizing Markup" section which describes all of the different things you can modify and how to do so. You can also find all of the render files in the core AdminThemeUikit directory — any .php files beginning with an underscore are custom render files that can be overridden. While not as broad in scope, there were other useful PRs added this week as well, so be sure to see the dev branch commit log if you are interested in seeing what else was added. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend.
    26 points
  17. As we continue to work towards the next master version, this week I've been working on fixing reported issues. A new $sanitizer->words() method was also added which reduces a string to contain just words without punctuation and such. It was added in part to work on an issue reported with the tags feature in the field editor, but should be handy for other cases as well. As part of that update, the existing $sanitizer->word() (singular) method was re-written to support the features needed for the new words() plural method. This week I've also been working on a pull request from Bernhard that enables greater customization of AdminThemeUikit by way of custom render files and hooks. I'm bringing in that PR and it has a lot of good ideas that have inspired some related updates to it. I've got a bit more work and testing to do before committing, but that part should be ready early next week, along with more core updates. Thanks for reading and have a good weekend!
    26 points
  18. All the updates I mentioned last week are committed on the dev branch today, and it's quite a lot of new code and revised code. There's enough here to justify a couple of version bumps, but I'm leaving it at 3.0.185 temporarily because the ProcessWireUpgrade module will see the version change and some people might upgrade automatically. Because there's so much that's been rewritten, refactored, added and changed here, I'd like it to marinate for a week on the dev branch before it triggers any upgrade notifications. Our dev branch tends to be very stable, and this is one week where there's enough new code that I don't want to call it as-stable-as-usual just yet (though it might very well be). In addition, it's also not totally finished as there's still some redundant code to be removed and stuff that needs to be moved around a bit, though everything should be fully functional as-is. I am running it here on the processwire.com site without any issues, so chances are that all is good, but I always like to be cautious. Below is a summary of what's new and changed. It's a bit technical, and there's nothing here that's all that important to know about, but whether you read on or not, just know that the core is getting even better and faster with updates like these. The core PagePaths module has been refactored and has multi-language support. Previously it only worked on single-language sites. Now multi-language sites can take advantage of potentially significant performance improvements offered by this module. This is one module that is not installed by default, but it's definitely worth installing: Modules > Core > PagePaths. The core LanguageSupportPageNames module has been refactored. Assuming I did it well, you shouldn't notice any difference other than that it's faster. For instance, one of the changes is that it drops its old indexes on the pages table and re-creates them in a different way. I discovered some situations where finding pages by multi-language path was resulting in full pages table scans. Using MySQL “explain” statements I found I could prevent that by reversing the order of the columns in the language-specific indexes, preventing the full table scan and making it many times faster. This could make a big difference on large multi-language sites, but is less likely to be noticed on smaller sites. The LanguageSupportPageNames module also gained a new configuration setting that lets you specify what should happen when a page is accessed at a language it's not available in: throw a 404 or redirect to the default language. The core PagePathHistory module has been refactored. It has a powerful new getPathInfo() method, though it's primarily of interest for internal core use. A new PagesRequest class has been added to the core and it can be accessed from $pages->request(). It primarily focuses on one hookable method: $pages->request()->getPage(). The method accepts no arguments but it analyzes the current request, identifies the page to render, and returns it. Previously this logic was in the ProcessPageView module. The benefit of this method is that you can now determine the page to render much earlier, like during the boot process. Previously the current page wasn't identified until after PW booted and the ProcessPageView module loaded. This will enable [for example] a module such as SessionAllow to decide whether or not to allow sessions based on what page was requested. In addition, this method is hookable, so you could have a module that adds its own logic to identify or change the page that should be rendered. A new PagesPathFinder class has been added to the core and can be accessed from $pages->pathFinder(). Like the PagesRequest class, this new class primarily focuses on one method: $pages->pathFinder()->get($path). The given $path can contain any page path, optionally containing language prefix, URL segments, pagination numbers, or even a previously named version of the path. It will find and validate that path and return an array of information about it. PagesPathFinder does its job very quickly. In fact, it's about 10 times faster (in testing/timing locally) than PW could previously identify this information using existing methods. PagesPathFinder will also take advantage of the PagePaths and/or PagePathHistory modules when appropriate, if they are installed. Below is an example of what the return value would be for path /es/hello/bar/baz/page3 where /es/ is the language prefix, /hello/ is the actual page, /bar/baz/ are the URL segments and /page3 is the pagination number segment. It analyzes everything out and returns a 200 "ok" response if the path is good, or in this case, it's returning a redirect because it detected a Spanish URL with English page name and pagination prefix, and it's suggesting a redirect: $info = $pages->pathFinder()->get('/es/hello/bar/baz/page3'); [ 'request' => '/es/hello/bar/baz/page3', // path that was requested 'response' => 301, // one of 200 (ok), 301 (permRedirect), 302 (tempRedirect), 404 (pageNotFound), 414 (pathTooLong) 'type' => 'permRedirect', // ok, permRedirect, tempRedirect, pagePathError, pageNotFound or pathTooLong 'errors' => [], // array of error messages indexed by error name 'redirect' => '/es/hola/bar/baz/pagina3', // suggested path to redirect to, blank otherwise 'page' => [ // info about page that was matched 'id' => 1237, 'parent_id' => 1232, 'templates_id' => 12, 'status' => 1, 'name' => 'hello' ], 'language' => [ 'name' => 'spanish', // name of language detected 'segment' => 'es', // segment prefix in path (if any) 'status' => 1 // language status where 1 is on, 0 is off ], 'parts' => [ // all the parts of the path identified [ 'type' => 'language', 'value' => 'es', 'language' => 'spanish' ], [ 'type' => 'pageName', 'value' => 'hello', 'language' => 'default' ], [ 'type' => 'urlSegment', 'value' => 'bar', 'language' => '' ], [ 'type' => 'urlSegment', 'value' => 'baz', 'language' => '' ], [ 'type' => 'pageNum', 'value' => 'page3', 'language' => 'default' ] ], 'urlSegments' => [ // URL segments identified in order 'bar', 'baz' ], 'urlSegmentStr' => 'bar/baz', // URL segment string 'pageNum' => 3, // requested pagination number 'pageNumPrefix' => 'page', // prefix used in pagination number 'scheme' => 'https', // blank if no scheme required, https or http if one of those is required 'method' => 'pagesRow', // method(s) that were used to find the page ] While you might never need to use this method yourself, ProcessWire now uses it on every request. And now that this logic is isolated from ProcessPageView and has a dedicated $pages API, it's much more open and we can, for example, more easily apply tests to this logic. I've covered a few updates here but there's more if you feel like digging in the commit log https://github.com/processwire/processwire/commits/dev. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    26 points
  19. We had a smooth rollout of the new main/master version 3.0.200 last week (read all about it here). If you haven't upgraded yet, consider doing so, this new version is a great upgrade. I'm going to add the 3.0.200 tag shortly after I finish this post, which should trigger other services (like packagist) to upgrade. I've had a new client project in the pipeline that I've been waiting to start till the new main/master version was out, so this week I started that project. Pete and I are working together on it, like we've worked on others before. It involves taking a popular WordPress site and rebuilding it completely in ProcessWire. I've done this a couple times before, but this time it's bigger and broader in scope. I always find the large site conversions to be great learning experiences, as well as great opportunities to show how ProcessWire can achieve many things relative to WordPress, in this case. At this stage, I'm having to spend a lot of time in WordPress just to get familiar with the content, fields, etc., as well as in the theme files (php and twig). The more time I spend in these, the more excited I get about moving it into ProcessWire. For this particular site, moving from WordPress into ProcessWire is going to result in a big boost in efficiency, maintainability, and performance. Part of that is just the nature of PW relative to the nature of WP. But part of it is also that the WP version of the site is kind of a disorganized patchwork of plugins, code files, and 3rd party services, all kind of duct taped together in an undeniably confused, undisciplined and fragile manner. (Though you'd never know it by looking at the front-end of the site, which is quite nice). This has been a common theme among WordPress sites I've dug into. Though to be fair I don't think that's necessarily the fault of WordPress itself. I always enjoy taking a hodgepodge and turning it into an efficient, performant and secure ProcessWire site. I love seeing the difference it makes to clients and their future by taking something perceived as a "necessary liability to run the business", and then turning it into the most trusted asset. I think the same is true for a lot of us here. We love to develop sites because it's an opportunity to make a big difference to our clients… and it's fun. Ironically, if past history is any indicator, I seem to get the most done on the core (and modules) when I'm actively developing a site. Needs just pop up a lot more. I don't know if that'll be the case this time or not, but I do expect to have weeks with lots of core updates and some weeks with no core updates, just depending on where we are in the project. This particular project has to launch phase 1 by sometime in July, which is kind of a tight schedule, and that may slow core updates temporarily, but who knows. I'll share more on this project and what we learn in this WP-to-PW conversion in the coming weeks. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    25 points
  20. A few weeks ago I told you about a new module I was working on that automatically saves front-end form submissions and can send email reminders for the user to finish their form. The module is called FormAutoSaver. This week I finished up that module and have released it both in the ProDevTools board and the FormBuilder board, and it's available for download now. Note that it is first release/beta test version right now. This module can be used with or without FormBuilder. Though when used with FormBuilder it is more of a turn-key setup that can be done in the admin. I've put together a dedicated FormAutoSaver documentation and information page on the site, so rather than repeating a lot of information here I'll point you to that, if you are interested in it. I also wanted to mention that a new version of FormBuilder has also been released this week (v52). There aren't any major feature additions to write about here, but there are several small improvements and bug fixes. By the way, I've added FormAutoSaver to one FormBuilder form on this site: the site submission form. There's not much to see, since it silently works in the background. But if you want to try it out, fill-in some or all of the form (making sure to fill in your email address), but don't submit the form. Feel free to leave the form or even switch devices. You should get a reminder email in 5-10 minutes with a link to finish your form. While you are there, please submit recent sites you've built in ProcessWire, we love seeing your work! My kids are starting spring break from school next week, so I'll be mostly offline and likely won't have any updates next week, but will be back to core updates after that and hopefully getting ready for a release candidate of our next master version shortly after. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    25 points
  21. This week we have ProcessWire 3.0.192 on the dev branch. This is about 20 commits ahead of the previous version and contains 11 issue fixes and 5 pull requests, along with various other updates. PR code contributors in this version including Daun, MrSnoozles, Radon8472, BernhardBaumrock and Tyde. Thanks! For more details see the dev branch commit log. In addition to core updates, in recent weeks I've also been working on a new module similar to the PageAutosave (developed for the admin) except that it is for front-end forms. It works with any front-end form (whether home brewed or from something like FormBuilder) and remembers the entered form values every time a field is changed. If the user doesn't submit the form, they get an email with a link to finish filling out the form after a configurable period of time. This is especially nice for order and reservation forms. Accompanying the module is a separate Process module that lets you view all the forms in progress in the admin. Each form entry has its own unique URL, making them easy for users to return to, from any device. Once the user submits the form, the data gets removed from the pending submissions database. This is something I've been meaning to develop for awhile, and with the admin PageAutosave module still fresh on my mind, I thought now was a good time to do it. Thanks for reading, Happy New Year and have a great weekend!
    25 points
  22. https://www.kaumberg.gv.at/ Hello everybody! Today I want to share a project that I've been working on for a year or so: The new website for municipal Kaumberg - a beautiful village near Vienna. To be honest, this project was way more work than I initially expected. The site has tons of content and the client came with lots of good ideas during the process of building this site. For example after we launched the site several organisations of the village realized that the system works great and is easy to use, so they wanted their own section with their own color scheme... Right now the system is maintained by several user accounts that populate content to the site. Some of them only in the news-section, others are allowed to publish to the sub-sites (eg for the fire department). Recently we won the 2nd price out of 190 cities in lower austria - where Kaumberg was by far the smallest one also having the smallest budget of the top rated cities! ### NOTE ### This system was built with scalability in mind. If you know any other municipals (preferable in a german speaking country) that could possibly need a new website using my setup write me a PM. If you are a marketing guru and know how we can sell this product to 100s of municipals, let me know. I know how to do that from the technical point of view 🙂 ### HIGHLIGHTS ### CONTENT Custom multi-level menu for managing loads of content pages that also works well with keyboard navigation 😎 --- EVENT MANAGEMENT Events are managed via the PW backend and presented as calendar on the website plus can be downloaded as PDF calendar in A3 format for printing: --- CONTENT BLOCKS I've developed a new (private) module called RockMatrix for versatile, easy and fool-proof content creation for this project. This setup ensures that even non-tech-savvy users can create content that looks nice and works on all devices from desktop to mobile: --- SITE SEARCH Another new module that was developed for this project is RockSearch. I hate site searches that do work on the first sight but do not on the second. For example if they show older results on top of newer ones. Or if they do not index content that is not stored within a regular text field but for example as image description. On the other hand I did not want to use ElasticSearch because it seemed to be overhead to send data to another service that is already stored in the database of my PW installation... RockSearch shows results based on different weighing mechanisms, for exampe a search for the garbage collection schedule first shows results that are nearer to the current date than others (both future and past). That means that a date two days in the future will be shown above one that is 10 days in the past. Also results get different score based on where the term was found - matches in the site title get higher scores than matches in the body or in image descriptions or the like. Each content block is a RockMatrix block that has a render() method to define the output on the website and - for RockSearch - has a method called "searchIndex()" that defines the content that is written to the search index that is queried for every search request: This setup makes it super easy to add new content elements and to add them to the search index 😎 --- SUB-SITES The client can create sub-sites for different organisations of the village having custom color schemes and managing user access: News can be tagged to show up on different areas of the website: --- OTHER The site uses no cookies and can therefore be used without an annoying cookie banner. Page hit statistics are gathered by PageHitCounter and shown by RockHitCounter Some other little features are short-links for social media (eg https://www.kaumberg.gv.at/goto-1027 ) or the possibility for creating custom subdomains for sub-sites like http://araburg.kaumberg.at/ I'm quite sure I forgot lots of great stuff, but I hope you enjoyed reading this article nevertheless 🙂 Looking forward to your feedback!
    25 points
  23. ProcessWire 3.0.190 has 15 commits relative to 3.0.189 and contains a mixture of issue resolutions and feature additions. We’ll review these below, in addition to updates for the PageAutosave and ProFields Table modules— https://processwire.com/blog/posts/pw-3.0.190/
    25 points
  24. This week we have some very useful new additions to both the core Repeater Fieldtype and the ProFields Repeater Matrix Fieldtype. This post covers all the details along with a couple of brief demonstration videos— https://processwire.com/blog/posts/new-repeater-and-repeater-matrix-features/
    25 points
  25. It took a little more time this week to wrap up what I was finishing last week (and the week[s] before). But I think it's now at a good spot to move on to something else, and so I started with some Repeater and RepeaterMatrix updates. In Repeater, a new feature was added that's been requested for awhile: the ability to add items anywhere you choose. Previously you could do it only by adding items to the bottom, and then drag them in place. Now you can click insert before/after [icons] in each repeater item header and it will add the new item in place. It is also depth-aware. This is something that I think will also be useful especially for people using repeaters for page builder type contexts. (Note: the feature does not [yet] work if you have all Ajax features turned OFF in your repeater settings). There's a GIF screencast below that shows you how it works. You can click the "insert before" or "insert after" actions and it inserts a new item in place. Alternatively, if you hover either action for a second, it'll show you where it's going to insert an item and you can click either the the item, or the action, to complete the insertion. There's still likely some optimizations and improvements to make in the JS here but so far it seems to be working well. (I made this as a GIF but for some reason IP.Board won't accept it, so here's a YouTube embed instead): Everything in Repeater also gets inherited by RepeaterMatrix, so you'll find this feature there too. But it's not fully functional there just yet. That's because RepeaterMatrix items also have a "type", so I'm working on a new version of RepeaterMatrix that lets you select a type once you've chosen where to insert the item. Another related feature in progress in RepeaterMatrix at the same time is a dropdown/select option for choosing what matrix type you want to add for items. This is an alternative to the current list of links that appears at the bottom. The dropdown also gives you the option of having groups of related types. More on that soon, potentially next week. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend.
    25 points
  26. I figure this is an off topic board among friends here (like our pub, or a real one) and it’s okay to write with honesty and engage in spirited or sometimes heated conversation. So just want to be clear that I like and respect @MoritzLost and value his opinions, even if I don’t agree with all of them. We will all have a diversity of views and everyone should feel free to share them, and likewise others should feel free to question those or state their own, which is what I’m trying to do. But I’m glad MoritzLost shares his opinions here. Plus, a little controversy also helps to engage the community, and drags me out of the code for a bit, so I can’t fault anyone for that. Once I can state my thoughts, I carry no concerns, but thought I should defend the things that deserved defending, as I always should. As a caretaker of this project, part of my responsibility to add my honest point of view to a conversation like this, especially when something is posted where I don’t fully agree. I think many in our community know the subjectivity of statements here (whether OP’s, mine, or another’s), but an equal number may not, as this is a public board. So some counterpoint or back-and-forth is not only clarifying to the larger audience, but also useful, as we explore different facets of it all, and lead to the most important takeaways. I appreciate that MoritzLost continues to defend his point of view on parts, despite my own defense or heated questioning of those parts. It helps me to better understand and know which are the parts that he thinks are most important and deserve the attention. We obviously don’t have the resources to pursue everything Craft does, so narrowing in on the most important parts—the meat of it—is helpful here. I’m traveling right now so can’t participate as much as I’d like to at the moment but just didn’t want MoritzLost or anyone else to think I was angry or something. Likewise I didn’t want anyone else to think they had to moderate themselves either. When I’m among friends I feel comfortable to express and be honest, and so should you. If you get a heated reply from me it’s because I care about it and value your opinion. I’ll spend more time reading everything when I get back, but I can see already it’s a good and helpful discussion.
    24 points
  27. Last week we released the new ProcessWire 3.0.184 master/main/stable version. This is our biggest version release in a year. It's been a very smooth stable version launch with no major issues so we're keeping the version number where it is this week. If you haven't upgraded yet, it's an easy and worthwhile upgrade. For full details see the blog post that covers it all. This week I have 3 new Textformatter modules released in the modules directory. These are modules that I developed earlier for recurring needs that I had, but this week decided to finish them up and release them. I hope that you might find one or more of them useful sometime. TextformatterFindReplace This module applies find/replace patterns to formatted text or markup at runtime. The patterns may be simple text or more complex regular expressions. This module can be handy if you perform a text replacement on all output from a particular field, without having to manually make the change on all instances where it might appear. For instance, maybe you need to insert a trademark symbol ™ after every appearance of a brand name, or maybe your website hostname has changed and you need to replace all references to it, or perhaps you need to replace all <h1> headlines with <h2> headlines. These are just a few examples of any number of possibilities. Read more / Usage / Examples TextformatterMarkdownInMarkup Enables you to use Markdown formatting codes in CKEditor (or HTML). A significant amount of content that is populated into the “bodycopy” field of websites is not actually written in the admin and instead originates from text editors, word processors, and other tools outside of the CMS. It then gets pasted into CKEditor, and then manually formatted into HTML using tools in CKEditor. This process of manually converting links, lists, headlines, bold, and italic text and more can be sometimes very time consuming. This module provides a time saving alternative, enabling use of markdown formatted text in CKEditor (or any HTML/richtext editor). It remains as markdown formatted text in the editor, but as soon as it is rendered on the front-end it is automatically formatted as HTML. This means that text like **this** gets converted to this, links like [this](https://processwire.com) get converted to this, and so on for most types of markdown formatting. This enables markdown formatted text to be written anywhere and the formatting to be rendered properly in your bodycopy when viewed on your website. Using this module means that you can mix richtext and markdown in the same copy. No longer do you have to manually convert all of the links, lists, bold/italic, and so on in pasted in text. This module saves me quite a bit of time when writing blog posts like the one last week. Much of the formatting in that post was markdown based, since I wrote the post in my text editor over a period of a couple weeks. Once I got it into CKEditor, I did some formatting with that too, but when it came to other formatting (especially links and inline `code`) it was a big help to have them just work, and not to have to re-do all of them manually with CKEditor tools. So why not just work exclusively in Markdown? Well I don't like working with just markdown most of the time, I much prefer CKEditor. But I also can't deny the convenience of markdown for a lot of cases too. So being able to use Markdown within CKEditor is the best of both worlds, to me at least. Read more / Supported markdown / Configuration options TextformatterEmoji This module converts more than 800 named shortcode emojis in ProcessWire text or textarea fields to the corresponding UTF-8 emoji character. 😜 This can be especially useful if your ProcessWire database uses the utf8 character set rather than utf8mb4, as it enables you to use emojis on an installation that typically would not be able to save them. This is because emojis usually require utf8mb4 (4 bytes characters) to be used by the database in order to store them. Though when you want to specify an emoji by name, this module will be useful regardless of your database charset. Read more / Supported emojis reference
    24 points
  28. Relative to ProcessWire 3.0.182, today's version (3.0.183) contains about 30 commits and resolves 23 issues. It also contains various small tweaks and improvements throughout. For example, when editing the title of a page, it updates the headline as you type in the page editor (in Uikit and Reno admin themes). I think we've got another 1-2 weeks of these kinds of updates (resolving issues and minor improvements) before we release the next master version, and am currently thinking that version will carry version number 3.0.184. I'm also continuing work here on the page snapshots module I wrote about earlier, but am going to wait releasing it until the next master version is complete. If you have a chance to test out ProcessWire 3.0.183 on the dev branch, please let us know how it works for you, and especially if you run into any issues. Thanks for being here and have a great weekend!
    24 points
  29. This week has been a continuation of last week in terms of ProcessWire development. While a lot of work has been done, there's not much new to report relative to last week, but I like to check in and say hello either way. I enjoyed putting a lot of time into the PagesSnapshots module this week and it's coming along nicely, getting closer every day. Today I've focused primarily on resolving GitHub issue reports, and am going to keep doing that every week till our next master version, which I hope to be ready in 2-3 weeks (same for the new module). But we'll adjust as needed. The next master version is going to be really solid, so I'm getting excited about it. I will likely bump the dev branch version to 3.0.182 next week. There were a couple more minor issues I wanted to get resolved in 3.0.182 but needed to spend a little more time with before I commit to the dev branch. Thanks and have a great weekend.
    24 points
  30. Padloper 2 has been released I will write a better post later. Need to know for now: Get it from here. We will be transitioning to a new website and/or shop in due course. For now, please get it from that old site. For now, and to allow it to bow out gracefully, initial purchases will be powered by Padloper 1. All hail Padloper 1 :-). Due to #2, and #3 and due to non-SCA compliance on that particular site, there might be Stripe issues. Apologies. Please contact me for help. Support for Padloper 1 has ceased. Security fixes will continue. Things I have promised to look at will be looked at :-). Support subscription period for beta testers' purchases commences today - 30 March 2022. It is a special day...in more than one way... Update 3 April 2022 Frequently Asked Questions A few questions are coming up with respect to this release. For now, I'll answer them here but might start a new threaded dedicated to FAQs. Q: Will beta testers have to purchase a new licence for this release? A: No. Your licence and download link are still valid. The only difference is the countdown of your VIP support commences on 30 March 2022. Subscriptions and updates are valid for one year. This download link was emailed to you when you purchased Padloper 2. Please contact me if you do not have a download link. Q: I have shops built in Padloper 1 that I'd like to migrate to Padloper 2. I don't have the expertise and/or time to do the migration myself. Is there paid support for this? A: Yes, paid support is available. We can migrate your Padloper 1 shop to Padloper 2 per your specifications. This includes both backend and frontend migration. You can purchase either or both backend and frontend migration. Please contact me to discuss. We will soon add this custom work information to our website. Q: Is there a backend/admin demo of Padloper 2 that I can test pre-purchase? A: Yes. We are currently putting final touches to it. An announcement will be made here once this is ready. Q: Which is now the official Padloper support forum? A: This forum will eventually become the official Padloper support forum Although it is a public forum, we will still be able to offer VIP support. The only difference is downloads will be not be available in the forums, since it is open. Support via email will still be available as well. Q: I am getting a called to undefined function bcmul() after install. What does this mean? A: Please see the minimum requirements for Padloper 2. You will need to install the PHP extension bcmath on your server. This is in order to get accurate rounding off of currencies.
    23 points
  31. This is great, thanks @MoritzLost for taking the time to write this up and share it with us. Although I don't agree with all the points (e.g. I think the PW emphasis on tree/hierarchy is a pro rather than a con) it's really interesting and useful to get an insight into how other CMSs solve problems and bring value to their users. I'm not sure if Ryan feels the same, but speaking as a person who enjoys developing modules and tools: eventually the limiting factor becomes ideas. That is, the will is there to keep creating useful things but the challenge is knowing what will consititute a useful thing to the audience. So getting user requests and descriptions of pain points is what's needed to keep the wheels turning. Regarding the Craft/PW comparison... You did state this clearly at the outset but I want to really emphasise this because it's such a major factor: the difference in cost between Craft CMS and ProcessWire is massive. I did a conservative estimate of the net income I would have lost as a solo developer over the last 5 years if I had have built all of my projects with Craft/plugins rather than PW/modules. It's approximately USD $43,000. For someone in my position that is just huge. Maybe I could have successfully added those Craft costs into the quotes but then maybe I would have lost many bids if I had done that. In general, if you think about the difference between something that's free and something that costs upwards of $299 it should be no surprise if there are some advantages to the thing that costs you $299. In fact it would be outrageous if you paid $299 for a thing and it was worse or no better than a free alternative. Suppose I would like a drink and I'm choosing between the free option (a bottle of tap water) and the $299 option (a bottle of Dom Pérignon champagne). The champagne should be a better experience than the tap water. That's why it costs $299. But when we bring this analogy back to PW/Craft, it's like ordering a bottle of tap water and then having the pleasant surprise that it's a very nice méthode traditionnelle. Maybe not quite as good as the Dom Pérignon, but at $0 that's extraodinary value and a lot of people would say it's the better choice for them. For the types of projects I use PW for, I have the occassional niggle but it's very minor stuff. Although I'd love to see PW match all the features of all its commercial competitors I also think it's reasonable to take the position that a free product is not going to be all things to all people. I actually wish there was more clarity about the kind of developer and kind of projects PW is targetted towards. In my opinion, narrowing the focus of PW and clearly communicating this at processwire.com would be a step in the right direction. Even if this was somehow expressed in negative terms, e.g. Don't know what a foreach loop is? Other tools will suit you better than PW. Looking for themes? Other tools will suit you better than PW. Looking for "a plugin for everything"? Other tools will suit you better than PW. Part of a large development team? Other tools will suit you better than PW. Building "enterprise" applications? Other tools will suit you better than PW. Working on projects with budgets in the mid-five-figures and higher? Don't be such a cheapskate, get out your chequebook because other tools will suit you better than PW. The way I see it, the person who will get most value and satisfaction from PW is a solo developer with at least intermediate experience (or a willingness to get there), working on projects that have demands that go beyond the basic but where the budget is somewhat limited. The main benefit that I get from PW is that I can build surprisingly powerful sites and build them fast so the hours/costs are kept down. This is the PW sweetspot and I think we should lean into it.
    23 points
  32. This week there have been various small core updates and fixes but the biggest change was to the installer in 3.0.191. Last week we removed all but the site-blank profile from the core, cutting in half the size of the core. And because of this, the installer now needed to provide more direction about downloading and installing other site profiles. So it now does that and it also links to a new page that describes all of the past and current site profiles, along with additional details on how to create and install site profiles. Speaking of creating site profiles, the Profile Exporter module was also updated this week. It is now PW 3.x exclusive and is updated to recognize and work with various aspects and $config properties that are specific to 3.x. ProcessWire 3.0.191+ and the Profile Exporter module now support a custom /site/install/finish.php file which is a template file that is called when installation of a new ProcessWire and site profile has finished, but before it has cleaned up the installer. It is a plain PHP file that has access to PW's API and the installer, so it can do pretty much anything you could do from a regular template file or module. I added this because I noticed a few issue reports for the Profile Exporter module were requesting support of one thing or another, and I found that nearly all of them could be added just by having a profile-specific finishing file, for those that want it. So if you want your site profile to perform any other types of customizations on top of what you can already do with a site profile, this is the place to do it. This is where things are at this week but perhaps we'll continue to go further with the installer in supporting more things too in the new year, as there have been several good ideas. Thanks for reading and I hope that you all have a Merry Christmas and/or Happy Holidays!
    23 points
  33. There's a new $pages->new() API method on the core dev branch this week. This method is similar to the $pages->add() method, in that it is used to add new pages to the DB, but is a lot better in my opinion. The $pages->add() method has arguments that you have to remember, whereas $pages->new() accepts a single-argument selector string, like many of the other $pages API methods. This new method can also auto-detect some properties that the add() method cannot (like parent or template). Let's take a look at how to use it. Here we create a new page from a selector string, and it returns the new page (saved in the database): $p = $pages->new("template=category, parent=/categories/, title=New Category"); If you prefer, you can also use an array: $p = $pages->new([ 'template' => 'category', 'parent' => '/categories/', 'title' => 'New Category' ]); The page name and parent can be auto detected if you specify a path: $p = $pages->new('path=/blog/posts/foo-bar-baz'); But if you start the selector string with "/" then it is assumed to be the path, so this is is exactly the same thing as above: $p = $pages->new('/blog/posts/foo-bar-baz'); In your selector string or array, you can specify any page property or field name that you want to set with the new page. It's basically just a quicker way to do something that's already pretty easy to do, but I thought people might find this new option even more handy in many instances. To create a new page, it needs to know the template and the parent. If your template family settings are configured in a manner where it can auto-detect, then it will do so, at which point parent or template becomes optional. In the last example above, it detected that the template was "blog-post" and the parent was "/blog/posts/". A few things to note (pulled from the method documentation): If a `path` is specified but not a `name` or `parent` then both will be derived from the `path`. If a `title` is specified but not a `name` or `path` then the `name` will be derived from the `title`. If given `parent` or `path` only allows one template (via family settings) then `template` becomes optional. If given `template` only allows one parent (via family settings) then `parent` becomes optional. If given selector string starts with a `/` it is assumed to be the `path` property. If new page has a name that collides with an existing page (i.e. “foo”), new page name will increment (i.e. “foo-1”). If no `name`, `path` or `title` is given (that name can be derived from) then an “untitled-page” name will be used. The `class` of the Page will be auto-detected when applicable (and something different than `Page`). An exception will be thrown if it doesn’t have enough information to create a new page in the database. I've also updated the existing $pages->newPage() method to accept the same selector string (or array). You might already be familiar with this method, but if not, it creates a new page in memory, but not the database. So you might use it to create a new page that you will call save() upon later. $p = $pages->newPage('template=blog-post, name=hello-world'); This week the core also has a few issue fixes. I'll wait another week before bumping the dev branch version though, as there's more to add first. Though the next few weeks might be little slower on core updates as the end-of-the-year seems to always be the busiest time when it comes to client work... everyone wants to wrap things up before the new year, and I do my best to accommodate that, while also keeping PW updates in progress. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    23 points
  34. Hello @ all I want to share a new module with you, which makes the creation and validation of forms easy. Take a look at the following example of a simple contact form: // A very simple example of a contactform for demonstration purposes $form = new Form('contactform'); $gender = new Select('gender'); $gender->setLabel('Gender'); $gender->addOption('Mister', '0'); $gender->addOption('Miss', '1'); $form->add($gender); $surname = new InputText('surname'); $surname->setLabel('Surname'); $surname->setRule('required'); $form->add($surname); $name = new InputText('name'); $name->setLabel('Name'); $name->setRule('required'); $form->add($name); $email = new InputText('email'); $email->setLabel('E-Mail'); $email->setRule('required'); $form->add($email); $subject = new InputText('subject'); $subject->setLabel('Subject'); $subject->setRule('required'); $form->add($subject); $message = new Textarea('message'); $message->setLabel('Message'); $message->setRule('required'); $form->add($message); $privacy = new InputCheckbox('privacy'); $privacy->setLabel('I accept the privacy policy'); $privacy->setRule('required')->setCustomMessage('You have to accept our privacy policy'); $form->add($privacy); $button = new Button('submit'); $button->setAttribute('value', 'Send'); $form->add($button); if($form->isValid()){ print_r($form->getValues()); // do what you want } // render the form echo $form->render(); This piece of code creates a simple contact form and validates it according to the validation rules set. Inside the isValid() method you can run your code (fe sending an email) Highlights: 30+ validation types Support for UiKit 3 and Bootstrap 5 CSS framework SPAM protection Highly customizable Hookable methods for further customization Multi-language You can download and find really extensive information on how to use at https://github.com/juergenweb/FrontendForms. Please report errors or suggestions directly in GitHub. Best regards and happy testing 🙂
    22 points
  35. It's been a quiet week on the dev branch (mostly), and so this post will also be short. That's a good thing, as it means we are at a stage where there's no new major things to immediately fix or add. Assuming that remains the case, by next week at this time we should have 3.0.200 released on the main/master branch. In next week's post I plan to outline all that's changed since our last master version, 3.0.184, stay tuned and have a great weekend!
    22 points
  36. This week I've bumped the dev branch version to 3.0.194. Relative to last week, there are a few commits fixing minor issues. Last week we covered some fairly major updates and I've not come across any concerning side effects, so figured it's a good day to bump the version. Next week my kids are out of school for winter break so I'll be around but I don't expect I'll have much in terms of updates to report next week, but definitely will the following week. Thanks and have a great weekend!
    22 points
  37. ProcessWire 3.0.195 contains a few fixes and optimizations relative to the previous version. While there aren't major additions, if you are running a previous version of the dev branch it's a worthwhile upgrade. Version 3.0.194 added the lazy loading fields, templates and fieldgroups, but there were still a few cases where PW would load them all. This version corrects those few cases. So if you considered 3.0.194 to be a nice upgrade, 3.0.195 is an even better version of it. There are also some useful bug fixes in this version. One notable bug fix (found by Adrian) was that the $pages->findMany() method was lagging due to some changes a couple versions back (limited to dev branch). That's been fixed so now findMany() is fast again. Also a notable addition: the included site profile (site-blank) now includes a /site/classes/ directory with an example HomePage.php file/class that serves as both a placeholder (to ensure the directory exists in Git) as well as an example custom class for the “home” template. I thought this was a good idea because many might not even know about the custom page classes feature without that obvious pointer to the feature. More core updates and additions next week. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    22 points
  38. Like last week, this week, updates continued on the core and matrix repeater fields. Repeater and matrix fields can now be configured to use fewer pages. When set, it won't create placeholder pages for repeater items until at least one repeater item exists for a given page and field. This can drastically reduce the number of pages consumed by repeaters in your system, and even more so if you are nesting repeaters. Eventually, this will become the default setting, but for now we are playing it safe and making it optional with a new toggle that you'll find on the Details tab when editing a repeater or matrix field: After enabling the "Use fewer pages..." Setting, the "Find an optionally delete unnecessary pages" checkbox will take care of cleaning up anything that isn't necessary for existing repeaters already in the database. If you have a large site with a lot of repeaters, this could be deleting a lot of now irrelevant stuff, so just be aware of that and backup ahead of time to be safe. Thanks to @Jonathan Lahijani for the idea/suggestion. Also new this week is the ability to copy and paste repeater items, as well as to clone above or below existing items. It handles this by replacing the existing "clone" icon action with a dialog that now lets you choose among various related actions. Among them is the ability to copy/paste from the same page or between different pages. The only requirement is that the repeater (or matrix) items are from the same field. See the video below for an example of how this works: This works with either Repeater or Repeater Matrix fields. But if you want this feature in Repeater Matrix, you'll want to upgrade to ProcessWire 3.0.188 and download the new version posted today (v8 beta) in the ProFields download thread. The ability to copy/paste repeater items was an idea originally from @David Karich and a module he developed called Repeater Matrix Item Duplicator. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    22 points
  39. This week ProcessWire has gone on a diet. I've been working on reducing the size of the core by moving all (except site-blank) installation profiles out of the core and into their own repositories. This cuts the size of the core in half, going from 15.5 MB down to 7.5 MB, which is quite a slim down! This means the site-regular, site-default, site-beginner, site-languages, and site-classic now live in their own dedicated repos on ProcessWire’s GitHub. The site-blank one remains, but I've updated it a bit to make the template files more useful for beginners while still keeping it a blank profile. I may do a little more with it and rename it to be site-basic or something, and then have an even more trimmed down site-blank in its own repo as well. I'm not yet sure about that, so will do a little more with it next week also. I also went through each of these site profiles and cleaned up a few things, corrected old and outdated links, and updated a lot of text in readme files and such. I think a lot of the more experienced users would also prefer not having extra profiles included in the core as well. This update came at the request of the community a few months back (I think it was Robin S. that requested it, but not positive). It's not like any of the current site profiles have a lot of bling or marketing value, as they really are more just technical examples and starting points. So I think it's kind of a win/win to trim down the core in this way. Though maybe one day we'll have a site profile that looks good and has good marketing value. But until then I think we gain more by keeping the core size nice and trim. The downside is that there's a little more for new users to figure out (downloading a profile), so in the next week or so I'm planning to update the installer to hopefully lessen that issue and maybe even build in the ability for the installer to download and install site profiles from the modules directory. That comes with its own security considerations, so I'm not yet sure we'll go that far just yet, but it's one of a few options I'm looking at. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    21 points
  40. This week I kept working on what's been in progress the last couple of weeks. That wasn't really the plan, as I was hoping to move on to other parts of the core. But I found it a took a lot of time to adjust everything to the new code and classes, and to refactor and remove other chunks of code that could either be simplified or removed. So these last few weeks of updates took a lot more time than I expected, and it's one of those things where once I got into it I felt I had to keep working until it was done as well as it could be. That meant getting pretty deep into some core logic. So in hindsight I'm slightly regretting refactoring so much code without major short-term benefits that can make more interesting reading here. And there are perhaps some short-term drawbacks in potentially introducing new bugs, as goes with any new code. But that's how it is sometimes. The good news is that it's a definite improvement in quality and I have no doubt there will be long term benefits especially in terms of improved performance and maintainability. But in any case, I'm glad to be wrapping up these particular updates so that I can move on to other parts of the core and Pro modules, and hopefully I'll have more interesting stuff to write about next time. One small addition you might find useful in these updates is that you can now identify the closest matching page when a 404 occurs. Maybe you want to provide a hint to users that land on a 404 as to what page they might have been looking for. Now you can do this in your 404 page template file: $p = $pages->request()->getClosestPage(); if($p->id > 1) { echo "<p>Were you looking for <a href='$p->url'>$p->title</a>?</p>"; } Like last week I'm not bumping the dev branch core version just yet because I don't want to trigger any upgrade alerts that might prompt people to upgrade immediately. I'd rather focus more on testing and leave these updates to those that are interested in that testing, helping to track down any issues. Thanks in advance for your help with testing these updates. Likewise, thanks for reading, I hope you have a great weekend!
    21 points
  41. ProcessWire 3.0.185 is the latest version on the dev branch this week. Relative to the current master (3.0.184) this is 9 commits ahead and contains various minor fixes, improvements and additions. Since our current master version is quite stable and no significant issues have surfaced since release, we'll likely be focusing on the dev branch for several versions before merging back to the master/main branch. For details on what's new in 3.0.185 dev see the commit log. ProcessWire Weekly #383 also includes some details on a few new selector features added last week that you'll find in this version, read about it here. Today I've posted a new module in the directory called Session Allow. This module enables you to configure whether to allow sessions for each request based on simple configured rules. Currently it requires ProcessWire 3.0.184 or newer. The reason I built this module is that I find the current $config->sessionAllow setting (where you define a custom function) can be a little complicated to work with, especially since it gets called before most of ProcessWire’s API can even be used. This module aims to make control of sessions a lot simpler than that. The benefit of being able to control when a session is allowed is that it lets you better focus your resources for sessions to just the requests where they will be needed, helping to reduce server overhead and improve performance. Currently it supports allowing (or disallowing) sessions based on page path matching rules and hostname matching rules. I also plan to add support for sessions allowed/disallowed per page template, which I think would be really useful. But it'll take some changes to the PW core to support that, as ProcessWire starts the session before determining what page has been requested (and thus what template will be used). So I'm going to make the necessary core updates and then save that feature for version 2 of this module. I'm releasing the module as "alpha" right now because I rushed a bit to get it out for today and feel it needs more testing before I can call it stable. So if you are interested in using it, make sure to test everything out in a development environment first. And if you do get a chance to test it, please let me know how it works for you. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    21 points
  42. Inertia Adapter ProcessWire Module Hello! Long time no see. I created this module so you can use Inertia.js (https://inertiajs.com/) with ProcessWire. Description Inertia allows you to create fully client-side rendered, single-page apps, without much of the complexity that comes with modern SPAs. It does this by leveraging existing server-side frameworks. Inertia isn’t a framework, nor is it a replacement to your existing server-side or client-side frameworks. Rather, it’s designed to work with them. Think of Inertia as glue that connects the two. Inertia comes with three official client-side adapters (React, Vue, and Svelte). This is an adapter for ProcessWire. Inertia replaces PHP views altogether by returning JavaScript components from controller actions. Those components can be built with your frontend framework of choice. Links - https://github.com/joyofpw/inertia - https://github.com/joyofpw/inertia-svelte-mix-pw - https://inertiajs.com/ Screenshots
    21 points
  43. This week I've been busy developing a site. It's the same one as the last few weeks, which is an established site moving out of WordPress and into ProcessWire. Next week the whole thing is getting uploaded to its final server for collaboration and for client preview. I've been pretty focused on getting that ready and don't have any core updates to report this week, though should next week. One thing about the prior version of this site (and perhaps many WordPress sites) is that there wasn't much structure to the pages used in the site, and hundreds of unrelated pages in the site confusingly live off the root, such as /some-product/ and /some-press-release/ and /some-other-thing/. There's no apparent structure or order to it. And those pages that do have some loose structure in the wp-admin have URLs that don't represent that structure on the front-end. There's very little relation between the structure one sees in the wp-admin and the structure that one sees in the URLs, or in the front-end navigation. They all seem to be completely unrelated. That's one thing that I've tried to fix, so that there is some logic and structure rather than having a bunch of unrelated pages all in the same bucket (is this common in WordPress?) But there's one big caveat. We didn't want to change anything about the actual URLs that are used on the site. This is a site with a long history, a lot of incoming links, and a lot of search traffic. The current URLs have been in place a long time and we didn't want to introduce more redirects into the site (there are already a ton of 301 redirects accumulated over time). So we wanted to make sure the existing URLs in the new ProcessWire-powered site are identical to what they were in the WordPress site. That might seem difficult to do, going from an unstructured WordPress site into a highly structured ProcessWire site... but actually it's very simple. Here's how: Making ProcessWire render pages from WordPress URLs We created a new URL field named "href" and added it to most of the site's templates. For established pages that came in from the old WP site, this "href" field contains the WordPress URL for the page. Depending on the page, it contains values like /some-product/ or /some-press-release/, /some-country/some-town/, etc. In most cases this is different from the actual ProcessWire URL, since the page structure is now much more orderly in the back-end. And for newly added pages, we'll be using the more logical ProcessWire URL. But for all the old WordPress pages, we'll make them render from their original URL. This is certainly preferable from an SEO standpoint but also helps to limit the redirects in the site. In order to make $page->url return the old/original WordPress URL (value in $page->href), a hook was added to the /site/init.php file: /** * Update page paths and URLs to use the 'href' field value on pages that have it * */ $wire->addHookBefore('Page::path', function(HookEvent $event) { $page = $event->object; /** @var Page $page */ $href = $page->get('href'); if(!$href) return; // skip if page has no 'href' value $event->return = $href; $event->replace = true; }); Now we've got $page->url calls returning the URLs we want, but how do we get ProcessWire to accept those URLs for rendering pages? The first thing we'll need to do is enable URL segments for the homepage template. We do this by going to: Setup > Templates > home > URLs > and check the box to enable URL segments. Save. Then we need to edit our /site/templates/home.php to identify when URL segments are present and render the appropriate page, rather than the homepage: $href = $input->urlSegmentStr; if($href) { $href = '/' . trim($href, '/') . '/'; $page = $pages->get("href=$href"); if(!$page->id || !$page->viewable()) wire404(); $wire->wire('page', $page); // set new $page API var include($page->template->filename); // include page's template file } else { // render homepage output } As you can see from the above, when URL segments are present, we find a page that has an "href" field value matching those URL segments ($input->urlSegmentStr). If we don't find one, we stop with a 404. But if we do find one, then we set the $page API variable to it and then include its template file, making that page render rather than the homepage. If there is no $input->urlSegmentStr present then of course we just render the homepage. That's it! By using these little bits of code snippets to replace ProcessWire's URL routing, now all the URLs of the old WordPress site are handled by ProcessWire. Like most things in ProcessWire, there's more than one way to accomplish this… We could have used URL/path hooks, or we could have hooked before Page::render to take over homepage requests with URL segments, before the homepage even got involved. Or perhaps we could have hooked in even earlier, to something in the ProcessPageView module or PagesRequest class. Or we could have used an existing module. Any of these might be equally good (or even better) solutions, but I just went with what seemed like the simplest route, one that I could easily see and adjust. Plus, it'll work in any version of ProcessWire. The actual solution I used is a little more than what's presented here, as it has a few fallbacks for finding pages and scanning redirect lists, plus passes along remaining pagination/URL segments to rendered pages. I'm guessing most don't need that stuff, and it adds a decent chunk of code, so I left that out. But there are a couple of optional additions that I would recommend adding in a lot of cases: Forcing pages to only render from their "href" URL and not their ProcessWire URL (optional) Our existing hooks ensure that any URLs output for pages having "href" values are always based on that "href" value. But what if someone accesses a given page at its ProcessWire path/url? The page would render normally. We might want to prevent that from happening, ensuring that it only ever renders at its defined "href" URL instead. If the page is requested at its ProcessWire URL, then we redirect to its "href" URL. We can do that by adding the following code to our /site/templates/_init.php file: if($page->id > 1) { // ensure that we are rendering from the 'href' URL // rather than native PW url, when href is populated $href = $page->get('href'); $requestUrl = isset($_SERVER['REQUEST_URI']) ? $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'] : ''; if($href && $requestUrl && strpos($requestUrl, $href) === false) { // href value is not present in request URL, so redirect to it $session->redirect($config->urls->root . ltrim($href, '/')); } } Enforcing uniqueness and slashes in "href" values (optional) It's worthwhile to enforce our "href" values being consistent in having both a leading and trailing slash, as well as making sure they are always unique, so no two pages can have the same "href" value. To do that, I added this hook to my /site/ready.php file (/site/init.php would also work): /** * Ensure that any saved 'href' values are unique and have leading/trailing slashes * */ $wire->addHookAfter('Pages::savePageOrFieldReady', function(HookEvent $event) { $page = $event->arguments(0); /** @var Page $page */ $fieldName = $event->arguments(1); /** @var string $fieldName */ if($fieldName === 'href' || in_array('href', $page->getChanges())) { // the href field is being saved $href = $page->get('href'); if(!strlen($href)) return; // make sure value has leading and trailing slashes if(strpos($href, '/') === 0 && substr($href, -1) === '/') { // already has slashes } else { $href = '/' . trim($href, '/') . '/'; $page->set('href', $href); } // make sure that the 'href' value is unique $pages = $event->object; /** @var Pages $pages */ $p = $pages->get("id!=$page->id, href=$href"); if($p->id && !$p->isTrash()) { $page->set('href', ''); $page->error( "Path of '$href' is already in use by page $p->id “{$p->title}” - " . "Please enter a different “href” path and save again" ); } } }); That's all for this week. Thanks for reading, have a great weekend!
    20 points
  44. When we released ProcessWire 3.0.200 one of the biggest differences from prior master/main versions was that PW now only includes 1 profile: the site-blank profile. This means there's probably going to be more people starting with it than before. Yet it is so minimal that I thought it deserved a bit of a walkthrough in how you take it from nearly-nothing to something you can start to build a site around. Everyone will have a little bit different approach here, which is one reason why the blank profile is a useful starting point. In this new post, here are some steps you might take when starting a new site with the blank profile— https://processwire.com/blog/posts/starting-with-the-blank-profile/
    20 points
  45. A week ago the new website of the wuppermann group went online. The Wupperman group is a EU-wide operating company with several locations in different countries. Their portfolio is all about steel fabrication. This includes flat producs and tubes & profiles. The technical production is developed by me, Olaf Gleba. The grafic design is supplied by C&G: Strategische Kommunikation GmbH. Homepage: https://www.wuppermann.com Some Impressions: (Secured) Shareholder portal, only available in german language Former screens deleted on behalf of the client. Technical notes: 1. All contents are populated by provided (i name them) content modules (e.g. Repeater Matrix Types) which gets the client what he needs and either prevent him from doing weird stuff. In nearly all textareas formatting is limited to a absolute minimum. For example, image insertion in CKEditor is generally prohibited. Instead there are dedicated fields for modules which holds media content. 2. This and that.. - vCards are build on the fly with a admin hook on page save. - PrivacyWire as CCM (just a few cookies to handle Matomo and external movie content) - Uses the SearchEngine Module to handle (multilanguage) site search - Email Obfuscation Module for frontend e-mail addresses - Wire Mail Smtp to deliver automated e-mails - Multilingual (currently german, english). Hungerian, polish, dutch following. - Ajax driven content (for example on the contact page) - Heavy use of Fieldtype AssistedURL (Fork by @adrian) to provide language dependend, local file linking (fieldname_[de|en] approach) - Login area (shareholder portal) with secured file downloads ($config->pagefileSecure = true) - Email New User, Admin Action (create users batcher), Force Password Change for functionality like adding new users with specific roles, Password reset, Change Passwort a.s.o. - Distribution of concatenate/minified css and javascript is cachebusted (happens within my developement environment,- no modules (like AIOM etc.) involved). - Thanks to @ryan* all images are delivered in WEBP format (with fallback). *) s. https://github.com/processwire/processwire-issues/issues/1497 - The site uses a bunch of modules provided by the ProFields Package (for example the Combo, Repeater Matrix and Table Fieldtypes).
    20 points
  46. In preparation for testing of the initial (alpha/early beta) release of Padloper 2, I would like to gather expressions of interest. In the past, some of you expressed a willingness to help with testing. It has been many days since and your position might have changed. In addition, I would like to do this in an organised manner so we cover as much ground as possible. The grounds I’d like to cover are usability and technical aspects with a bias towards the latter. Please also note that there are a number of planned features that will follow the initial release. Hence, we shouldn’t focus much on those. These and similar thoughts will be added to a planned features list (more on this below). The main focus of this testing is to make Padloper 2 production-ready. In order to properly organise this testing, I will need to gather some information from you. I will be doing this via Google Forms. The most important detail will be your email address. I will need this in order to inform you how to access Padloper 2 as well as for other necessary communication. I will not use your email address for any other purposes nor pass it to any third-party 🙂. Other information to be captured in the form would be what areas of testing you will you want to be involved in and your preference for planned features (since I will need to prioritise them). Forms are better than plain emails in this respect. Please note the following if you wish to be involved in the testing programme: Pricing and subscription will follow the model I have previously stated (similar to ProcessWire Pro Modules). However, for the testing programme, your subscription period will NOT start counting down until after the production-ready release. You will still also have VIP support (please note the nature and location of this may change). To be fair to other testers, anyone joining the programme needs to actually spend time testing the product. If you won’t have time to do this, please wait for the production release. This initial release is NOT a production release. Although it may work for some in that regard, it will not be tagged as production-ready (hence the alpha tag). Licences will be the usual three: (i) Basic/Single Site Licence, (ii) Developer Licence and (iii) Agency Licence. I can explain the different between these three if anyone needs clarity. The initial release will have the introductory prices of €150, €300, €900 for single, developer and agency licences respectively. Cooling period will be 14 days (within which a full refund can be requested, no questions asked). Please note that this time period may change for the production release. Here is the link to the Google Form to express your interest in the testing programme. The form will close in 10 days. Many thanks for your patience. Hope to see you soon in the testing programme. I trust you will enjoy Padloper 2 as much as I have had the pleasure (and honour) of developing it 🙂.
    20 points
  47. This week there are a few minor updates on the dev branch, though not enough yet to bump the version. The most notable are a few improvements to the database selectors you can use with $pages->find() and similar API calls. While working through issue reports a few weeks ago, there were a couple issue reports that indicated one selector or another not working. What I found was that it was working as designed/built, but they were just selector features that had never been supported. But they also seemed like good/useful shorthand syntax to support, so I was enthusiastic to add support for them. I just wanted to wait till we were back on the dev branch, as we are now. Here's what's been added: Support for OR values on "status=" selectors. Now you can match one status or another with PageFinder selectors by specifying a selector like "status=hidden|unpublished", and this will find all pages that either have hidden or unpublished status. The hidden and unpublished are just likely the most common examples, but you can use any other status name, or as many statuses as necessary in your OR condition. Previously it was possible to match pages having one status or another by other means, but it was far from straightforward. Now it's nice and simple. Support for OR values on "sort=" selectors. This one isn't technically an OR condition since we are giving a command to the selector engine about how it should sort, rather than trying to match something. You can tell it how to sort with the syntax "sort=date|title" as an example. That would be shorthand for "sort=date, sort=title", which is saying "first sort by date, then by title". Support for combined start and limit selectors. Previously you have had to specify "start=x, limit=y" separately, if you needed it. Now you can optionally specify both as part of the "limit", for example "limit=5|10" which is shorthand for "start=5, limit=10", and actually kind of similar to what it translates to in MySQL, which is "LIMIT 5,10". I suspect that not many people ever use "start=" in their selectors unless using "start=0" to prevent a set from paginating. So if you wanted a set of 10 pages that don't follow the current pagination, you could specify "limit=0|10" in your selector, or the more verbose "start=0, limit=10" will work in any PW version. Support for matching children paths. This is a small one, but previously you couldn't do "children=/path/to/page" to match a page having the given child path. Though you could do "children=123" where 123 is the ID of the child page. It has been updated so that it can now support paths in addition to IDs, just as "parent" does. I'm not sure why we didn't have support for this one before, it likely just hadn't come up yet. You can use OR values here too if you'd like. As before, you can also use subfields on "children" as well. Worth mentioning is that these are additions for our PageFinder engine which queries the database. We also have the lesser used in-memory selectors which don't yet support all of these, but I've put it on my to-do list. In-memory page finding selectors come into play if you are post-filtering pages that you have already loaded from the database into a PageArray. We like these to maintain some consistency with the database selectors when possible, so I'll likely have that working here soon. From this end, I'm also putting ~2 hours of work into the new Pages Snapshots module every day, with a lot of progress but also still a lot of ground to cover. Separately, I'm working on pulling more than 4 million articles out of an older proprietary legacy CMS for a newspaper organization and converting them to a standard XML format for import elsewhere. A lot of data conversion has to take place in terms of cleaning up markup for each article. ProcessWire is the tool that all of this is being done in, and I'm using a lot of $sanitizer methods as well as keeping HTML Purifier busy! Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
    20 points
  48. ProcessWire 3.0.182 is now posted on the dev branch. For a review of what's in this version, see the "Latest core updates" section of ProcessWire Weekly #374 and #375 plus this week there have been 12 additional commits with new issue resolutions, improvements and additions which can be found in the dev branch commits log. It's possible that ProcessWire Weekly #376 will also cover some of these updates when it is released too. I'd planned on even more in this version, but ended up losing a day of work yesterday as we had no electricity all day (it happens). So I worked outside in the yard instead— 3 issues were resolved, 4 improvements were made and 1 garage was organized. Focus in the coming weeks is on our next main/master version (core, not yard). If you have a chance, please take a moment to add sites you've built with ProcessWire to our sites directory. And if it's one that's already in the directory, feel free to add it again when/if it goes through a major redesign or redo. I'm really motivated by seeing the great work that all of you do and always enjoy seeing more of it. Plus, I'm thinking @teppo also likely looks at the newly submitted sites when considering the site of the week for his ProcessWire Weekly issues. If you find the existing categories on the submission form don't quite match a site you want to add, please send me a PM to let me know and I may be able to add new categories. Thanks for reading and have a great weekend.
    20 points
  49. This week we have 12 new commits to the dev branch largely focused on resolving older issue reports. Since the focus right now is primarily on getting the next master version live, we'll likely keep this focus for the next week or two, making sure the next big release version strikes the best balance between new features, issue resolutions and timeliness. Thanks for being here and have a great weekend!
    19 points
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