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Ice Cream, PHP Dreams, and DDEV: A Delightful Summer Combo! 🍨😎☀️


bernhard
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Oops, I'll do it again: I'll present DDEV at the next PHP Meetup Vienna in August! Also I'll record the talk so that everybody here that is not yet using DDEV can watch it on my youtube channel to get a quick impression. The title is already found thx to the help of chatgpt 😄

Now I ask for your input what you love about DDEV, what problems it solves for you and what you like most about it. And maybe also what you didn't like on other systems that you've used before. Where do you think does it stand out from the crowd? What does it do similar to other available options? What are those options (just to get a birds eye view)? ...

I'll let the first words up to you 😄 Thx for your input and help 🙂 

MEMO

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  • bernhard changed the title to Ice Cream, PHP Dreams, and DDEV: A Delightful Summer Combo! 🍨😎☀️

What users may not like about ddev is the need for WSL2 or Docker on Windows compared to e.g. XAMPP stack. Devs are often using Linux/Mac or Windows/WSL2 anyway, so this shouldn‘t be a big hurdle for devs, while it may be for users wanting to try stuff quickly on Windows.

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My absolute favourite tool for developing still is: LARAGON
Since I left Windows a few years ago... I still miss it.
It's so easy to use, super fast setup/installation, new sites are only one click away.
AWESOME!

Installing DDEV on Linux is quite a big task, reboots included.
After the 3rd or 4th time it get's easier but still quite a bit of work.
AND it's big. It takes quite a bit of space on your disk. A few gig at least. 

I remember my first DDEV setup and I swore to myself: NEVER EVER AGAIN!
But then I tried my old setup with installing Apache, MySQL, PHP, and all the other stuff... it was quite humiliating and I installed DDEV again. Yet, never got it up and running on any Arch-based setup, which is fine, as I'm running Debian now.

What I really enjoy is chaining commands (using aliases).
Something like: ddev start && ddev launch && code . && exit from the terminal, wrapped in a FZF script or local .sh file... Nice!

Which brings me to the benefits of DDEV... you can create your very own workflow with DDEV using aliases.
A new PW instance or maybe even the other CMS some people are talking about... you can do quite a lot, still the docs are sometimes a bit hard to read and maybe too verbose (too much fluff in this case).

My personal most loved features is that you can share your config to setup an identical environment with ease.
.ddev/config.yaml for the win!

Looking for and grabbing those setup prompts for DDEV to get the setup you need is just pure Gold!

Some of you may remember I wasn't a fan of DDEV in the past. 😁

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  • 3 weeks later...

 

On 6/21/2023 at 10:03 AM, bernhard said:

what problems it solves for you and what you like most about it. And maybe also what you didn't like on other systems that you've used before. Where do you think does it stand out from the crowd? What does it do similar to other available options? What are those options (just to get a birds eye view)? ...

 

Not super sure if these have been brought up but I'll lay my experience so far.

Problems solved for me and what I liked the most about:

  • It solves sharing the exact environment with other devs within the project itself. I just recently started working with someone who I am also training and to put and example, explaining how to do aliases for php versions in MAMP Pro was a pain, running composer had to be done all with absolute paths for the php version, the composer install in itself too, etc. So even if trivial for an experienced dev, it does introduce friction for less experienced ones. It's all there right after the ddev start, clean and isolated from whatever other project. Of course, maybe there was a cleaner way to do this I never never got to know 'em, don't wanna trash MAMP Pro haha.
  • All the command suite, but specifically love the database import/export ones no need to open phpmyadmin anymore for a simple db import.
  • I really understand the value now of  each project  running separately. One example, it had happened to me that I was running a database of a few GB in MAMP PROs single installation and it was a pain to turn on and off when I had to update any php.ini configuration since it brought up and down the whole thing, even if I was working on a completely different project than the mentioned big database one. I also didn't love the phpmyadmin screen full of ALL the databases from ALL the projects. 
  • It's been really easy to move everything to ddev! 
  • It got me into development with Docker and the whole Docker topic in general which wasn't something I was really into since I didn't "need" it. Now I am looking into how to leverage this to deploy productions sites with containers. Maybe this could a whole other topic for another talk? I am trying to move away from panels such as Runcloud/Ploi into a "cloud services" approach and I have the feel that Docker is crucial to this.  

Pain points: 

  • Probably the only pain point I've had is that on a laptop where I might have had docker installed before, I ran the installation commands and got into this issue. But I am not really sure on how to give more input here since I went into "delete all and reinstall mode" and it just worked. Also in my main computer I decided to try Colima and realized that the container volumes were not the same! Maybe this is obvious if you are familiar with Docker. But overall these paint points seem to be very specific, "layer 8 cause" problems haha.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
17 hours ago, bernhard said:

We are live and have a very special guest in the video 🙂😎🚀

Nice presentation here. As always.
I was kind of suprised to see so little feedback or knowledge about DDEV, MAMP, and Laragon. What were they using? Real servers in a local network? Either way...

The interview was a great surprise. He seems to be a great guy with lots of knowledge in every space someone could imagine.

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