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  1. This is a short tutorial on how to use Nette Tester with ProcessWire. As you will see it's very easy to setup and use and it's perfect for testing your code's functionality. With bootstrapping ProcessWire it's also possible to check the rendered markup of pages using the API, checking page properties, etc. It's also a great tool for module developers for writing better code. While there will be nothing extraordinary here that you couldn't find in Tester's docs this can serve as a good starting point. Prerequisites: PHP 5.6+ 01 Download Tester Go to https://github.com/nette/tester/releases and download the latest release (currently 2.0.2). Download from the link reading "Source code (zip)". You can use composer also if you wish. 02 Extract Tester files Create a new directory in your site root called "tester". Extract the zip downloaded here, so it should look like this: /site /tester/src /tester/tools /tester/appveyor.yml /tester/composer.json /tester/contributing.md /tester/license.md /tester/readme.md /wire ... 03 Create directory for test files Add a new directory in "/tester" called "tests". Tester recognizes "*.Test.php" and "*.phpt" files in the tests directory, recursively. 04 Create your first test In the "tests" directory create a new "MyTest.php" file. The first test is a very simple one that bootstraps ProcessWire and checks if the Home page name is "Home". This is not the smartest test but will show you the basics. Add this to "/tester/tests/MyTest.php": <?php namespace ProcessWire; use \Tester\Assert; use \Tester\DomQuery; use \Tester\TestCase; use \Tester\Environment; require __DIR__ . '/../src/bootstrap.php'; // load Tester require __DIR__ . '/../../index.php'; // bootstrap ProcessWire Environment::setup(); class MyTest extends TestCase { // first test (step 04) public function testHomeTitle() { $expected = 'Home'; // we expect the page title to be "Home" $actual = wire('pages')->get(1)->title; // check what's the actual title Assert::equal($expected, $actual); // check whether they are equal } // second test will go here (step 06) // third test will go here (step 07) } // run testing methods (new MyTest())->run(); I've added comment placeholders for the second and third tests that we will insert later. 05 Run Tester Tester can be run either from the command line or from the browser. The command line output is more verbose and colored while in the browser it's plain text only (see later). Running from the command line Navigate to the "/tester" directory in your console and execute this: php src/tester.php -C tests This will start "/tester/src/tester.php" and runs test files from the "/tester/tests" directory. The "-C" switch tells Tester to use the system-wide php ini file, that is required here because when bootstrapping ProcessWire you may run into errors (no php.ini file is used by default). You may load another ini file with the "-c <path>" (check the docs). If the title of your Home page is "Home" you should see this: If it's for example "Cats and Dogs", you should see this: Running from the browser First we need to create a new PHP file in ProcessWire's root, let's call it "testrunner.php". This is because ProcessWire doesn't allow to run PHP files from its "site" directory. The following code runs two test classes and produces a legible output. IRL you should probably iterate through directories to get test files (eg. with glob()), and of course it's better not allow tests go out to production. <?php ini_set('html_errors', false); header('Content-type: text/plain'); echo 'Starting tests.' . PHP_EOL; echo '--------------------------' . PHP_EOL; $file = __DIR__ . '/PATH_TO/FirstTest.php'; echo basename($file) . ' '; require $file; echo '[OK]' . PHP_EOL; $file = __DIR__ . '/PATH_TO/SecondTest.php'; echo basename($file) . ' '; require $file; echo '[OK]' . PHP_EOL; echo '--------------------------' . PHP_EOL; echo 'Tests finished.'; exit; Navigate to "DOMAIN/testrunner.php" in your browser to execute the file. If every test succeeds you should get this: If there are failed tests the execution stops and you can read the error message. If there were more tests (eg. ThirdTest), those won't be displayed under the failed test. 06 DOM test This test will check if a page with "basic-page" template has a "h1" element. We will create the page on the fly with ProcessWire's API. To keep things simple we will add the new test as a new method to our MyTest class. Add this block to the MyTest class: public function testBasicPageHeadline() { $p = new Page(); $p->template = 'basic-page'; $html = $p->render(); $dom = DomQuery::fromHtml($html); Assert::true($dom->has('h1')); } This will most likely be true but of course you can check for something more specific, for example "div#main". Note that we have used the DomQuery helper here (check the "use" statement on the top of the file). 07 Custom function test You will probably want to make sure your custom functions/methods will work as they should so let's write a test that demonstrates this. I don't want to complicate things so I'll check if the built-in "pageName" sanitizer works as expected. Add this to the myTest class: public function testPageNameSanitizer() { $expected = 'hello-world'; $actual = wire('sanitizer')->pageName('Hello world!', true); Assert::equal($expected, $actual); } This should also be true. Try to change the expected value if you are eager to see a failure message. 08 Next steps You can add more methods to the MyTest class or create new files in the "tests" directory. Check out the range of available Assertions and other features in the docs and see how they could help you writing more fail-safe code. Once you make a habit of writing tests you'll see how it can assist making your code more bulletproof and stable. Remember: test early, test often If you find out something useful or cool with Tester make sure to share.