mikeuk

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About mikeuk

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  1. A difference perspective as someone who would love to be able to sell PW based websites to clients in the UK, where PW is an advantage not a reason to need their trust . 1) the PW website looks dated and does not highlight what makes PW better (or different) to the myriad of other similar placed CMSs. Drupal got this right in my opinion. They went for a well publicised redesign some years ago. It looked good and worked well (though i don't think the switch to twig templates in D8 is a good idea). 2) growth surely only matters in comparison to others in a similar space and the top 3. Those will less growth will disappear regardless. I think the success of PW will be a clear message showing why it's a better choice than WP, and why it's a more suitable choice than others. Right now there are far too many CMSs in a similar space (business / news / blog websites). What a developer wants does not count for that much as WP has proven. A search for a suitable CMS with any number of criteria for popular website types shows the issue. Each link almost a different list, the only consistent ones being the 3 (Joomla, Drupal, WP). And then there's the static site generators (which are now getting online content management options). So I would love to see PW have an amazing first impression and be presented in a way as something users might choose (which was the magic WP found) rather than only developers. For example, I think Concrete5 see the marketing importance of this and clearly make an effort to attract non-tech people as well. Another example is Grav. Straight away the message is 'no database' and 'faster websites'. Very clear. Here's an article that is about the best I've seen to encourage people towards PW: https://www.cmscritic.com/processwire-vs-wordpress. A lot more of that kind of thing is needed though. PW needs that kind of strong message clearly visible that gives it its space, which not only attracts developers but can be clearly seen by users or the developer's potential client. If it was my project (I know, if I care so much why don't I start one?), then I'd make the following priorities: Update website with a focus on users and potential clients (developers won't care so much) Encourage blog posting that gives fair comparisons, reviews and tutorials for PW Highlight a clear USP to PW that can be the main message on the website and the one for all of us too share Use that USP to define the roadmaps for future development (confidence is what space a project will be matters also) That's my 2 cents.
  2. [edit] move to more recent thread, my mistake. https://processwire.com/talk/topic/15591-steps-to-greater-popularity-and-better-promotion/
  3. Thanks for the comment. Just to clarify, that is not where I am coming from at all. I'm not thinking at all about making development easier for me (and Wordpress is not on the table for me). I'm looking at this from the clients perspective. Maybe some more background will clarify. I tried (mostly unsuccessfully) to attract clients to a static site generated set up, with additions of easy content adding / editing through me or an online admin interface (with some limitations). I am 100% convinced it is a better option over a CMS for small businesses that are not regularly updating content, but it was almost impossible to sell. Every business owner had CMS expectations due to Wordpress and Joomla. So I learnt a lesson there. I don't want to repeat a similar mistake by going in with a CMS I believe is better, but not be able to sell it. So from this point of view things that really matter could be if I can sell it to business owners who know or have heard of Wordpress, will the admin look and feel good and meet their expectations, will PW provide a base which makes small business websites practical. For example, I'm very familiar with Drupal and believe it not to be suitable at all for small businesses. It has been and still is growing into an enterprise focus system. In my opinion, Joomla is not as good as Drupal, but is a better choice for small businesses, if we are only talking about those two.
  4. Interestingly, from what I've read around the forums, a number of people have suggested Processwire is idea for large data sites or where a great deal of customisation is needed (both of which make sense based on what I know about PW), although at the same time those same people did not specify they wouldn't use it for small businesses
  5. Thanks, I will look for those. Fair point. There's not a forum I know where there is expertise and it not linked to a specific system. Maybe stackexchange...... But the question is about specific use case area, rather than is is good or not. Probably not. Not sure where I will start or exactly what will offer. The main concern right now is if I'm potentially losing opportunities by not going with a more recognised name. That topic is not meant to negative at all towards Processwire, I'm sold on it's potential. I'm just thinking very practically about this business idea and assuming other developers have hit the issue. I've made mistakes before by not asking such questions first
  6. I'm looking at setting up a development 'shop' that is something along the lines that some Drupal dev companies are offering large enterprises, but focused on small business clients and a complete service (development, marketing, e-commerce potentially, administration and support). I'd like to base it on one CMS platform. I know Drupal and Joomla pretty well (as a developer), and basic knowledge, growing, with Processwire and see no barrier there. As a system, if it was for me only, I would go with Processwire. However, the main objective here is a service that will both produce quality websites (which I'm confident I can do with this) and also a business that will work and be attractive. So the question is, do you think Processwire is the right tool? The obvious disadvantage is the brand recognition, strongest with Joomla, stronger with Drupal (in my experience, most passively interested business owners have heard of Joomla). It seems in the wider field, currently ModX and Concrete5 have slighter better brand recognition that this. Interested in your thoughts on this. I've added a poll for a quick way to give an opinion, but would prefer comments
  7. All good. Did that many times in another place where I was supposed to be one of the responsible ones. Didn't always get the friendly part right though. Yes, this makes sense. I don't think all new users are super rational though. No problem. I did think it might be a joke. You have a very cool alphabet so I can forgive you Ha 3dopovia (i don't know all the letters - Na Zdrovia) That's what I think a lot of newcomers might think also. About xampp, it's always slow. but there was once a memory tweak or something like that that made a difference. I'd need to find it again, if it even still is relavant. Yes Ryan seems like one of those people that's too nice and too helpful Where are all the grumpy people?
  8. Thanks. very close to starting a project so may well need the forum to get things right. Will also be nice to get back to some PHP as Golangs been the recent diversion (Hugo).
  9. Did it really come across as insulting? That was defintely not the intention so apologies if it did. For quite a while I was helping out with a popular Joomla extension, and occasionallly learned some things from newcomers / outsiders who noticed things we didn't (especially things that affected the project's first impression). I genuinely felt the demo would make a better impression with Pro stuff not included. @LostKobrakai, thanks for the detailed response. That's good to know. Fully appreciate a demo is not a good test of frontend performance. I should also say, had I not liked the way it worked (see my other post), I would not have bothered posting
  10. Ok, first setback in testing Processwire, after 5 mnutes of use. The following is not intended to be antogonistic, just honest. I appreciate I'm new here, but I do have experience elsewhere. The demo is kind of pointless as far as any gauge of frontend performance while it has ProCache modules and related installed. Uninstall is impossible as Post operations are not allow in the demo. In my opinion, this is going to put a lot of conciencious developers off. Although I'm sure it wasn't intended to shout 'this is really not free', it does. I don't want my frist experience with Processwore to be with a 'commercial' version, I want to know how it does in it's base form. I'm not giving up and will contact to ask for access to a demo without Pro modules.
  11. Hi all This is curious. After spending quite a lot of time using, learning and advocating Drupal as an API interface rather than template builder, I come here and find Processwire seemingly having been doing this all along. I often thought Drupal became heavy and bloated from a page loading point of view, with so many users using modules (Views, Panels, themes with sub themes, etc) that control layout. So I thought, hang on, shouldn't we be making the template statically and adding the bits we want to it? Followed that route for a few sites, but found little interest in the idea from others. So here I am, experimenting with Processwire and it seems the whole ethos is that approach. Or I am a lot less smart than I thought and completely misunderstand this system.....