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  1. Hi everyone. I'm coming to an old thema of mine. When it comes to present different sized and different orientated images on screens, it is always a bit frustrating. Maybe most time (on desktop) there is a landscape oriented widescreen, on which you can show a panorama image (2:1) very large but that it fits into the viewport. If you want to show a square image (1:1) you only have the half (content/amount?) of surface area. (The image only has half superficial content). And if you want show a Portrait (maybe 2:3) this image is somewhat more smaller displayed than the square one. So, I'm searching for some math that calculate dimensions depending on a equivalent superficial content and depending on the available viewport. Puh! But maybe it also shouldn't be a (technical) linear one. when downsizing the panorama to an equivalent, it looks a bit poor, alone in the viewport. For example, with the width and height of an image one can create a superficial content number: 100 is a square, 200 is a 2:1 and so on: 1:1 = 100 5:4 = 125 4:3 = 133 3:2 = 150 2:1 = 200 Is there anybody on the forums who can build a elegant maths formula for that? Or there are other suggestions, thoughts to that?
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