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Peter Knight

New CMS (and PW) blog

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Hi guys

I've started a new blog on Content Management and while it's not even remotely finished, thought I'd share here. I'm hoping to fill it with news, interviews and tutorials as I proceed. 

Content is pretty thin at the moment and there's plenty of design bits to fix.

http://www.CMSsizzle.com

Why and who?

The target audience isn't so much you hard-core, seasoned CMS professionals but more likely to be oriented towards people who are new to the CMS's. I also want to highlight the great features of my favourite CMS because I think CMS developers should be more aware of what other platforms are doing. 

Because it's built in PW, it helps me learn PW and the Blog Module.

Anyway, I'll give it a go and hopefully I can find time to update it regularly-ish :)

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Whilst I have no experience with Craft I hear a lot of good things about it and I'm glad of your other two choices.

Continue to buck the trend and not mention the "popular" ones :)

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Hey Peter - great job. Just one small thing I noticed - you are missing some css definitions for the page number buttons

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Well I think the best way to learn ProcessWire is to just use it for a site. When I started using it I directly build a site with it and learned most of which I had to know about it in that time (back then when there was no multilanguage and PW 2.2 (or even 2.1?) was the hot shit) :) 

Site looks nice :) Only change I would suggest: make the sidebar at least 220px and not only 150px. It looks a little ... pressed :)

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Good job! And already some nice content.

Small thing, the url for the image cropping post is http://cmssizzle.com/blog/posts/example-post/

Not wrong of course, but if it's not too heavily indexed or crosslinked you might consider changing it to something more descriptive.

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Install page path history and rename with confidence.

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I believe Craft, ProcessWire and MODX (in no particular order) represent the best content management software for web professionals and the best content editing experience for clients.

I believe ---- that is subjective   

the best ---- that is absolute (2 times)

You should rethink about that headline.

Did you consider to use US spelling for

the word favourite ?

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I believe ---- that is subjective   

the best ---- that is absolute

He has a strong feeling about the subject, but recognises that this is his opinion and not the absolute truth. Sounds good to me.

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It's just a way of expressing his opinion? Not that i'm a native speaker but i don't see an awful lot wrong with it. In my opinion ;) no need to pad it with all kinds of nuances.

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He has a strong feeling about the subject, but recognises that this is his opinion and not the absolute truth.

This maybe clear to the writer but for visitors such a line takes away credit of the website,

unless added somewhere in the headline.

In my opinion no need to pad it with all kinds of nuances.

Saying something on a website is a different thing than talking about it between people you know.

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I believe ---- that is subjective   

the best ---- that is absolute (2 times)

You should rethink about that headline.

Did you consider to use US spelling for

the word favourite ?

The headline is fine - good strong copy and journalistic style. It is called "setting your stall out" and sets the scene for an article. 

And the gentleman is in the wonderful Dublin; the spelling of the word favourite is fine. Nice to see proper English even after all that Guinness/Murphy's.... :)

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And the gentleman is in the wonderful Dublin; the spelling of the word favourite is fine. Nice to see proper English even after all that Guinness/Murphy's.... :)

Hehe. I must admit that some of my favourite brews right now are actually from the UK. But like my CMS preferences, they're from micro breweries and not the usual, obvious choices :)
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If it is about a personal or a hobby website, fine. But if you are writing about Craft, Modx and Processwire

you should stay on the objective side and not your believes. It is part of making an objective website for

visitors and not a subjective website for your self.

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I believe ---- that is subjective   

the best ---- that is absolute (2 times)

You should rethink about that headline.

Did you consider to use US spelling for

the word favourite ?

How would you phrase it? Must admit, I'm happy with the tone. Interested in your input too.

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Every new website that is made known in this forum seems to get only likes. Doesn't matter how

the website looks, doesn't matter what is written or how it is written. There seems to be no place

for constructive criticism. It is immediately taken as an act for saying something ugly. Of course

now that I bring this up you will say that this is not true.

Well then, go back as far as you can in this forum and see for your self.

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When one war is over another one starts. There's no peace in this world :)

pwired, everyone likes to see a new PW website come to public. The likes on the forum are not supposed to be an evaluation of the sites, we have the directory for that.

And please let people give their opinion, just like you gave yours.

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Constructive criticism has nothing to do with war or letting people give their opinion.

I always thought it is part of making things better.

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I would hope someone would have the courtesy to send me a pm, if they really had critical thoughts about my work.  I would appreciate and take that better.  As I tell people that I mentor, It's all about intent and purpose.  Just my two cents.

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Every new website that is made known in this forum seems to get only likes. Doesn't matter how

the website looks, doesn't matter what is written or how it is written. There seems to be no place

for constructive criticism. It is immediately taken as an act for saying something ugly. Of course

now that I bring this up you will say that this is not true.

Well then, go back as far as you can in this forum and see for your self.

I don't understand why you would drop this in relation to this particular thread? Of course there is room for criticism. Nobody made a problem of your point and Peter asked for further input from you, but instead you come up with this slightly off-topic reply.

In this case, i and some others don't share your critique. That's the point of having an open discussion. If i would have agreed i would say so as well.

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Only change I would suggest: make the sidebar at least 220px and not only 150px. It looks a little ... pressed :)

I agree with this.

Perhaps a bit wider at 250px?

THANK YOU FOR THE POST ABOUT THE AUTOUPDATER ;) I upgraded from 2.4.18 to 2.5.0 without a problem.

---

@Ryan

THANK YOU!

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Good job! And already some nice content.

Small thing, the url for the image cropping post is http://cmssizzle.com/blog/posts/example-post/

Not wrong of course, but if it's not too heavily indexed or crosslinked you might consider changing it to something more descriptive.

  

Install page path history and rename with confidence.

Thanks for the tip re. Url and Path History.

I've updated the URL yet the link above is till broken even though Path History is installed.

Whilst I have no experience with Craft I hear a lot of good things about it and I'm glad of your other two choices.

Continue to buck the trend and not mention the "popular" ones :)

I't's a great CMS. I meant to be further into my learning but am having too much fun with PW right now.

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Thanks for the tip re. Url and Path History.

I've updated the URL yet the link above is till broken even though Path History is installed.

I't's a great CMS. I meant to be further into my learning but am having too much fun with PW right now.

I don't really know these modules so can't help you right of the bat. What it does show however is that your 404 page needs a little bit of work ;)

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Hi Peter,

are those dropdown selects intended to exist? http://uploadpie.com/gS6Cp

To me they look useless because they are simply outputting what is already there in the sidebar.

Lastly the text in the footer seems a little tiny to my eyes :)

Firefox 32.1 Osx

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Hehe. I must admit that some of my favourite brews right now are actually from the UK. But like my CMS preferences, they're from micro breweries and not the usual, obvious choices :)

Okay, I really, really like that analogy!

It should be used in PW marketing ... :)

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