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Zorin OS Check it out !

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Ok guys we all heared about it that on April 8, Microsoft stops supporting windows xp,

no more updates etc. Even Banks warn if you do telebanking on a windows xp computer,

after April 8 Banks don't refund your money in case something goes wrong.

But what does this have to do with processwire ??? I hear you thinking.

Well we all use computers to do our website development and most of it we do

in the browser, besides of course some ide we use for php, css, js etc.

Maybe only a few of us still use windows xp, others already use windows 7

or work on a Mac or use Linux.

Linux, yes that was my point here because I stumbled upon a very interesting Linux Distro,

one that is really different from the others, and worth checking out.

Not trying to be a linux fanboy here or a windows basher, no, that's boring anyway,

let's go beyond that and check this out:

Zorin Linux OS

http://zorin-os.com/index.html

http://zorin-os.com/tour.html

Quote from one of the pages:

The main goal of Zorin OS is to give Windows users easy access to Linux. That is why Zorin OS incorporates the familiar Windows 7-like interface by default to dramatically reduce the learning

curve of this system while still experiencing the main advantages of Linux. You can also utilise the desktop with other interfaces. This is thanks to the exclusive Zorin Look Changer which lets you

change your desktop to look and act like either Windows 7, Windows XP or GNOME 2 in the free versions of Zorin OS. The Premium versions also include the Windows 2000, Unity

and Mac OS X looks.

But don't take my writing for it and check it out for your self.

I don't think it is going to waist your time.
 

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Their website makes me nauseous...

Any Ubuntu derivative would be ok for someone transitioning from Windows, I don't think imitating the interface will make it easier. For old computers (if it had XP on it, is old enough) I would suggest http://elementaryos.org/ or http://xubuntu.org/, for even older computers I would suggest http://lubuntu.net/

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I don't think imitating the interface will make it easier.

One of the reasons why Linux is still not so popular is the linux desktop.

Making the linux desktop as easy as windows or mac does make it easier.

And that's exactly what this distro let's you do.

And so work as easy with processwire as you do with windows or mac.

(Especially for not so experienced linux users)

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The main problem for people transitioning to Linux is it simply does not have many of the applications they want, like MS Office. Even with Libre Office working hard to make itself more up to date, the gulf between it and MS office continues to grow - it is one huge achilles heel. 

And Mac's have made it even worse for Linux - people like not only the interface and the drop-in App style method of working, but they like the entire culture that goes with it. 

I know Linux purists tend to poo-poo that side, but actually it is really important to people on a device that has become so much part of their lives. They want it to be slick and cool like they want their games consoles to have pretty boxes or want their cars to talk to them. People like fashion, they like trendy, they like the "in thing," and that is not a bad thing, it is human nature. 

People wont buy because something is more stable or is technically more pure, they will buy it because it is capable of doing really silly, fatuous things when you turn it on. 

You don't buy an Armani shirt because of the stitching, you buy it because you want to tell people  you wear Armani.

Ubuntu is not Armani - though its stitching is probably great. :)

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Joss, if you install Elementary you'll be very surprised with how polished and well thought out it is. It's a really cool experience :)

It's true about office, though things might be changing soon. Right now I just lauch skydrive and work there when needed.

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The main reason for people not switching to Linux based distros is still that they are not confortable on it. Even I as a developer find it hard to get into Linux just because I grew up using Windows 98, xp, 7 and now 8 and I'm not used to the terminal, which linux distro's heavily rely on.

And as for the most famous desktop distro for linux, Ubuntu... The Unity UI is just horrid, it feels so cheap...

And + the fact that most of the business software wont run on linux distros, it still is a poor gaming platform (thanks to steam its getting better) it's just not as easy as windows is... 

And the fact that XP support ends.... Boy.. that aint a suprise...

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Joss, if you install Elementary you'll be very surprised with how polished and well thought out it is. It's a really cool experience :)

It's true about office, though things might be changing soon. Right now I just lauch skydrive and work there when needed.

I did last year for fun (and a couple of others) - but my benchmark is that it has to be usable by the rest of the family without them learning anything at all. My "teens" have zero interest in anything to do with computers beyond using them and having the same dancing gnomes as their friends.

I also use Onedrive, but I actually edit on the full version of office because not all the writing tools I need are on the web version. 

I think there is also an issue about installing software - with windows and mac there is the assumption (a good one) that when users install stuff they do no want to know anything about the tech side at all. They want to hit one button and go.

That is not consistent with Linux at all - with some software it is as simple as Windows, then with others you suddenly need to add repositories, find dependencies and so on and so forth ... at the end of which my lot have gone off clubbing and want nothing more to do with it. 

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The main problem for people transitioning to Linux is it simply does not have many of the applications they want like MS Office.

The main reason for people not switching to Linux based distros is still that they are not confortable on it.

I just posted this special distro with easy windows and mac desktop for (any) processwire users  :)

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I think there is also an issue about installing software - with windows and mac there is the assumption (a good one) that when users install stuff they do no want to know anything about the tech side at all. They want to hit one button and go.

http://elementaryos.org/docs/user-guide/installing-apps :P

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I'm a processwire user .... and an MS Office user and an Adobe CC user. As much as possible I try and stay on one platform otherwise my old brain gets very confused.

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There's no point on trying linux if professionaly you need applicattions that don't have support, I myself am very close to switch to mac because I will need to use inDesign. But people that only need a computer and don't have any special needs concerning apps will be very well served with some Linux distros. My parents don't know anything about computers and have linux at home. I just had to install it and from time to time press the "update system" button because they don't.

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There are downsides to all Operating Systems (Windows included).  What we should celebrate is that there are people who are expanding the horizons and coming up with new ways of using computers.  The more Operating Systems developed, the better it is for the common folks who are tired of the expensive, bloated and bug ridden releases by the big name Commercial vendors.

People will always gravitate towards the newest systems.  Combine that with ease of use and viable software then you have a winner.  Consumers will switch to new technology that they feel is useful for their daily personal, work or recreational lives.  I'm a Linux desktop user, however I would be the first to admit that for the non-technical, Linux appears to be hard to learn, inferior and basically weird.

Linux gets better every release, however there are a lot of people invested in a Windows or Mac world who will never see themselves using a Linux desktop.  What's really amazing is that some of these same individuals would scoff at anyone removing their Linux Server or Open Source tools.

I applaud Windows, Android, Mac OS, iOS, Linux and any other Operating System out there.  The reality is that if it wasn't for governments, universities and individuals who believe in standards, non of what we have seen in the last 40 years would have been possible.

I ask that we give each Operating System a chance.  It may not be for us but it may work for someone else.  Normally innovation in one Operating System usually makes it's way to all the other Operating Systems over time.  That's always a good thing.

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Worth following: KDE Visual Design Group

KDE is finally focusing on its looks in an organized manner and skilled crew.

My own switch to Linux has turned into an epic 3 year journey.. Early on I identified what aspects need work. Along the way I have funded applications and tried to help in other ways.

When preparing to switch to Linux I think it's smart to devote some of your time to strengthen a weak area that is important to you. For a FOSS software project, this might involve community organizing, documentation, translation, web stuff.. You don't need to be a C/C++ coder to help.

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I like GNU/Linux or unix like systems so much that using it 14 years and about 8 years as main desktop system everywhere. My wife, childrens, mom, friends, ... using it too without problems. Nothing is perfect so donwside is lack of some aplications which may be solved with virtual machine (seamless mode...) and some hardware support (which is better every day). I figured before long time that i dont need any windows aplications for my daily computer use!

There are plenty ready to use Linux distributions, but i am always ended with some rolling release distribution (Gentoo, Arch, ..) with my own builded "holy grail desktop enviroment" from scratch. This is my desktop history on few screenshots.

Last time i installed Manjaro Linux to three new Linux users and they like it more than Windows before.

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There's no point on trying linux if professionaly you need applicattions that don't have support, I myself am very close to switch to mac because I will need to use inDesign. But people that only need a computer and don't have any special needs concerning apps will be very well served with some Linux distros. My parents don't know anything about computers and have linux at home. I just had to install it and from time to time press the "update system" button because they don't.

I love managing linux servers, and I have wanted to run a linux desktop for a long time, but Adobe has been the stumbling block for me. Illustrator is the main issue, but InDesign and Photoshop are also key things I can't really do without. It's a shame really because I think there are decent linux alternatives for just about everything else.

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Joss, if you install Elementary you'll be very surprised with how polished and well thought out it is. It's a really cool experience :)

It's true about office, though things might be changing soon. Right now I just lauch skydrive and work there when needed.

If you CAN install it that is... ;)

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I feel like rambling some more.

The Year of the Linux Desktop is a cliché at this point, but I don't understand why it was even predicted when Linux wasn't a gaming platform. Now the situation has changed: we have Valve, Crytek and GOG. Combined with XP EOL and the Windows 8 disaster, we might see a dramatic increase in desktop Linux adoption this year.

It is worth noting that in this post-Snowden world, even the European Parliament recommends open source as much as possible:
 

Takes the view that the mass surveillance revelations that have initiated this crisis can be used as an opportunity for Europe to take the initiative and build up, as a strategic priority measure, a strong and autonomous IT key-resource capability; stresses that in order to regain trust, such a European IT capability should be based, as much as possible, on open standards and open-source software and if possible hardware, making the whole supply chain from processor design to application layer transparent and reviewable;

When considering FOSS communication solutions, we are lucky to have PRISM BREAK to guide us.

Adobe suite replacement is a real issue for professionals. I really wish an entity like EU would sponsor the development of FOSS graphics software to nudge them to the pro level (they are so close). For projects that have organized paid development, the development speed has been noticeably faster than the ones that just plod onwards in an aimless fashion. Case in point is Krita (paid dev) vs. Gimp. In this case, the success of the Qt toolkit might have boosted Krita's development, while GTK+ (used by GIMP) is being abandoned in favor of Qt by an increasing number of projects (f.ex. LXDE and Subsurface). This is a benchmark that demonstrates how it is easier to build stuff with Qt than GTK+.

Regarding a replacement for Illustrator, Inkscape is another slow-moving project and it uses GTK like GIMP. Both Inkscape and GIMP only use the latest GTK version (3) in a development version.
There is a new vector editing software called PrintDesign, which uses the wxWidgets toolkit, but unfortunately the developer lives in Ukraine and the current crisis may have affected development.

An InDesign alternative is Scribus, which uses Qt, but has seen periods of even zero development. While development is active again, the history means that Scribus, too, is just "getting there".

When thinking about dropping Photoshop, it makes sense to use several FOSS tools: Krita for painting, GIMP for general editing and darktable/digikam/etc. for photography/RAW editing. Note: Krita has adjustment layers and 32 bit depth support, while GIMP does not.

If you feel you have too much money, you can boost the development of important FOSS graphics tools. There's a whole bunch of fundraisers going on right now:
Libre Graphics Meeting 2014 - an important event, which keeps collaboration between projects going
Blender Foundation feature animation project Gooseberry - a huge project with 12 studios participating. Will impact the whole field of FOSS graphics and video and even audio.
Pitivi 2014 fundraiser - I have named 2014 The Year of the Linux Video Editor.
Synfig development for April 2014 - 2D animation tool Synfig (uses GTK+) has had very good results with paid development since fall 2013.
Symmetry Painting for GIMP - GIMP doesn't pay developers, but nothing prevents devs from raising funds on their own.

If you think you will suffer from having too much money in the future, be sure to follow this thread of mine:
Ongoing crowdfunding campaigns

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Scribus, too, is just "getting there".

You're being too kind. Unfortunately I don't think it will ever get there...

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@ Beluga, a pleasure reading your informing Linux over-view and positive post.

Linux development is lately indeed noticeable reaching more the public, and yes

even governments like you wrote. If it wasn't for positive people without a static view,

Linux development would not be growing as it is today.

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I like linux because flexibility

I like mac because iOS (iPhone)

I like windows because ... well I don't like it xd

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Thanks to Radek for the mention of Manjaro Linux - it has helped me greatly. One of my colleagues at work had managed to get CryptoLocker on to her Vista desktop machine, so it needed urgent and drastic action. I installed Manjaro XFCE Edition and was well impressed by everything about it. Given that her department only need web browsing, email and to be able to open pdfs and the occasional Word file, it can do all of that straight out of the box, in a very Windows-like interface. And it runs much quicker than Vista and isn't threatened by viruses/trojans/malware etc to the same degree.

So long as she doesn't have any insurmountable problems over the coming week, I will probably migrate several Windows pcs to Manjaro this time next week.  ^-^

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That's funny, I posted about manjaro linux 2 weeks before radek

https://processwire.com/talk/topic/5736-export-profile/?view=findpost&p=56061

Anyway, in the mean time, I moved away from zorin, pclinuxos and manjaro linux.

Always hunting for a linux distro that matches closer the ease, look and feel of xp and 7.
Linux Mint Cinnamon "petra" distro. It's Ubuntu done better. Allows the much-needed level
of personalization on the user interface. It has everything either out of the box or installable
for the default user: email (web or client), skype, text, pdf, pictures, music, movies, etc.
There's good money these months in either downgrading from 8 to 7 or upgrading xp
to 7 or linux.
 

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You can't actually get Windows 7 any more unless you buy OEM (technically voiding your license straight away). They stopped manufacturing retail discs late last year so expect Windows 8 to be the only option before long for Windows users.

Not really surprising since Windows 9 is rumoured to be making an appearance late next year (note I used the word "rumoured" - I don't tend to trust many of these so-called news sites and their "reliable sources").

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