alxndre

Processwire compared to Django

Recommended Posts

Hello, good citizens of Processwire-land!

Does anybody here have a good experience with Django-Python development? I don't have a deep experience with it beyond simple pages and forms. Now I have a client that want's to have something developed in Django, and I think it will require a lot of work.

How would you compare working with Django with working with ProcessWire? If it's possible I'd like to convince her to use processwire instead, but she seems set.

Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you mean the Django CMS that is built on the Django framework, you can find a good starting point for the comparison here:

http://cmsmatrix.org/matrix/cms-matrix/processwire

http://cmsmatrix.org/matrix/cms-matrix/django-cms

Just compare them both in the matrix. It is the old versions of both systems, so processwire has some more features then showed on that table, but it is still a useful comparison.

For the comparison of the Django Framework (not the CMS) you could use sites like http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_web_application_frameworks. And I think that the information page http://processwire.com/about/why/ contains some good arguments for convincing the clients...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, codelearner said:

@alxndre Django is the better choice between PW and Django.  3 months in PW development usually half or even less in Django.

 

You came to some pretty solid conclusions in less than a week

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, codelearner said:

How fast can any PW coder make an admin site? Only 3 lines of code in Django.

zero lines of code in PW - the admin is built in.>:D

Plus what you call an admin site in Django is a piece of garbage, i've used them and it is piss poor compared to PW admin.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, codelearner said:

Please give concrete examples why PW is superior to Django not fanboys/amateur answers.  Thanks.

Perhaps if you could give us solid reasons why Django is superior we could have a reasoned discussion. We might even be able to learn some valuable things that could be incorporated to improve ProcessWire, but unfortunately you are only providing responses like:

"Only 3 lines of code in Django"

If you actually want a reasoned discussion, please ask reasonable questions and provide reasonable arguments for your own opinions. Otherwise there is no point continuing this discussion.

Thank you.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn! I've been away from writing in the forum for so long, and now I'm being pulled in by another stupid discussion... @codelearner If you like Django so much, I can't honestly think of a reason why you're not at their forum instead... can you explain? Are you here because you're seriously interested in PW? Than open your mind, people at this forum have a lot of knowledge to share and they will do it in the most friendly way you've experienced on the internet. If you just want to pick a fight please go somewhere else, Reddit would be a great place to start.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

troll feeding on

Yes, we are fanboys because PW is a system that can be loved. We enjoy what it has to offer and since you are here I guess Django is not like that.

troll feeding off

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@codelearner Listen my friend, everyone is tired of trolls. If you don't have anything to say, just don't. Consider this an absolutely last warning.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@codelearner I'm not sure if PW is superior to Django.

But some of the strong point of PW is

... that we have that PW2.1 installation running since 6 years without any updates. We don't have to, since there's no security update needed or anything else. But updating it to PW3.x is a matter of 5 minutes, and it still works without doing anything. Except switching the RTE editor, not because it's an issue but CKeditor is now the default RTE. From the PW side mostly there's like 0h maintenance over the years. Developing and supporting projects with PW can be a fun task.

... there's a hierarchical structure that naturally represents a website structure that can be squeezed and squashed and moved around without much efforts, build self containing structures and wrap it up with some code.

... build modules in no time for whatever task. It's consistent with using the API you already familiar with. PW admin itself is built using its API. It's easy to manipulate and extend.

... occasionally you'll hear a "I just love PW" from yourself or your coworker. Usually when the deadline is tight and you have make last minute changes that would be impossible in other Systems. 

Quote

"3 months in PW development usually half or even less in Django."

How do you come to this conclusion? Have you already developed something 3 months in PW and then built it in Django?

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think comparing PW to Django is like comparing PW to Laravel.
They are different beasts with different use cases.

All of them are Awesome (Althought I prefer Flask,  Yarrrg for pirates!)

Maybe comparing PW to https://wagtail.io/

or https://www.django-cms.org/en/

could be more fair since they are CMS just like PW is.

I think the bottom line of chosing a toolbox is down to simple questions:

1- I like using it?

2- What use cases can I fulfill?

3- Makes my team and clients happy to work with?

 

So just use what is best for the requirements, restrictions and overal context of the project at hand.
Not all projects can be done with Laravel, Django or PW.

Maybe you can mix both and have the best of them :).

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/3/2017 at 5:46 PM, codelearner said:

But fanboys comments will  not help getting PW into the level of the bigboys.

In this forum you will not find too many fanboys (ie. members) who are interested in comments like this. I do not know what "bigboys" mean but you should familiarize yourself with the philosophy behind the ProcessWire project:

https://processwire.com/blog/posts/new-2.8-version-current-projects-and-pw-usage/

Quote from Ryan: "I'll be honest, I've never cared much about our usage numbers, as I'd be doing the same thing with ProcessWire even if there were just the two of us, you and me. I do this work because I love it, and I don't care about being popular. Popularity is a burden as far as I'm concerned. Our focus has always been to be the best CMS according to our standards rather than anyone else's. But it's also encouragaging to look at things outside every once in awhile and see that ProcessWire is becoming more and more recognized in this market."

23 hours ago, codelearner said:

Thanks for your open mindness.

ProcessWire forum members are open-minded. You came here to insult them.

Edited by szabesz
typo
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have heard alot about Django from a mentor, from what I hear it's actually quite a robust solution, so to be honest am a fan of use what's right , I don't subscribe to using Processwire for every type of application most times, I might find myself using Symfony for certain projects because of the flexibility and proper architecture that requires me to handle things and remove certain bundles , but I mostly use Processwire to build sites I want clients to manage, the moment an application has so many custom and specific needs, I would use an application framework, now if I were in Python world, because I don't really like Python i'd use Django for Site management but would prefer to use something light and flexible. 

 

Also I think you should state views without insulting, calling people "Fanboy" is not the right approach all the best 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have been patient and we have been accommodating with this thread. However, it has now reached a point whereby this thread is no longer constructive and therefore it has been closed.

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.