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Jan235

Twig templates and ProCache

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Hello,

I'm started to play around with processwire. And I like it! My local dev system is up and runnig. I'm using the template factory with Twig. Anybody who use Twig and ProCache or is it possible to use both modules?

Thanks in advance

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Yes, it will work. I use Latte template language, but it's pretty similar to Twig, and ProCache work flawlessly.

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Hello Sergio! Thanks for your fast reply. That means that ProCache generate static assets from the used .php and .twig files and deliver the static assets per .htaccess rewrite rules?

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Yes. Unless I'm utterly wrong. ;) 

Twig will render PHP files at runtime, and their output in the browser is the same output that's processed by ProCache. ProCache will render static version of the pages in /assets/ProCache-xxxxx/page-name/index.html that will be server by .htaccess rules (or Nginx rules, like I do)

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Forgot to say, welcome to the forums! :)

ProCache is awesome. And if you were you, I'd take a look at @tpr's Latte module too. It's great!

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2 hours ago, Jan235 said:

Hello Sergio! Thanks for your fast reply. That means that ProCache generate static assets from the used .php and .twig files and deliver the static assets per .htaccess rewrite rules?

That's correct. The output from Twig is cached as static file and if present, ProCache directly serves this via .htaccess.

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Thank you Wanze for the quick reply. So with this information in mind I'll use ProCache the first time the page needs more performance O0

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