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Some css ressources


Christophe
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  • 3 years later...
On 4/25/2018 at 2:29 AM, 3fingers said:

This one also is very cool: https://codyhouse.co/

I purchased CodyHouse Pro (it's $129 for a lifetime license) a couple months ago.  While I haven't use it yet for any projects (I haven't taken on anything new and large for a few months), it's looks like an exceptional product and value.  It's ridiculously comprehensive.

@rafaoski seems to be the only one using it with ProcessWire as far as I know.  I'd be interested in hearing what the experience has been like building with it on a real world, intricate project.

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45 minutes ago, Jonathan Lahijani said:

I purchased CodyHouse Pro (it's $129 for a lifetime license) a couple months ago.

What do you get there?
Back in the days cody house was more or less something like a plain HTML/CSS/Webdesign course of some kind.

Right now by looking at their site it looks almost like you would get quite nice skeletons for what ever use case.
Am I wrong with that?

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22 hours ago, wbmnfktr said:

What do you get there?
Back in the days cody house was more or less something like a plain HTML/CSS/Webdesign course of some kind.

Right now by looking at their site it looks almost like you would get quite nice skeletons for what ever use case.
Am I wrong with that?

CodyFrame is their CSS framework (free).  It uses the BEM convention.  It handles things like colors, spacing, fonts, form styles.  No JS.

Then there's CodyHouse UI Framework / components which use CodyFrame as the base layer.  There are many free components, but CodyHouse Pro membership (now a one time fee for life), gets you access to all the components.

The difference I see with CodyFrame + CodyHouse components vs Bootstrap/UIkit is that CodyFrame is just and base layer and doesn't try to do every possible thing.  CodyHouse components are where they make their 1-off, tightly coupled section templates.  By tightly coupled, I mean that the component relies on the utility classes from CodyFrame + specific CSS classes for the component that aren't in CodyFrame + any dependencies on other components + custom, vanilla JS for that particular component (this part is huge).  I feel like this 1-off approach gives them a lot of flexibility, although it means you as a developer have to take the necessary files and insert them correctly into your project (which is not hard).

Here's their offcanvas component which is a good example of what I described... it relies on (a) CodyFrame + (b) custom CSS for that particular component + (c) custom JS for that particular component +  (d) other component dependencies (like animated menu button):
https://codyhouse.co/ds/components/info/off-canvas-navigation
https://codyhouse.co/ds/components/app/off-canvas-navigation

They've done all the hard work for you.  I think this will be my go-to front-end framework moving forward.

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