$session->login() method

Login a user with the given name and password

Also sets them to the current user.

Example

$u = $session->login('bob', 'laj3939$a');
if($u) {
  echo "Welcome Bob";
} else {
  echo "Sorry Bob";
}

Usage

// basic usage
$user = $session->login($name, string $pass);

// usage with all arguments
$user = $session->login($name, string $pass, bool $force = false);

Arguments

NameType(s)Description
namestring, User

May be user name or User object.

passstring

Raw, non-hashed password.

force (optional)bool

Specify boolean true to login user without requiring a password ($pass argument can be blank, or anything). You can also use the $session->forceLogin($user) method to force a login without a password.

Return value

User null

Return the $user if the login was successful or null if not.

Exceptions

Method can throw exceptions on error:

  • WireException


Hooking $session->login(…)

You can add your own hook events that are executed either before or after the $session->login(…) method is executed. Examples of both are included below. A good place for hook code such as this is in your /site/ready.php file.

Hooking before

The 'before' hooks are called immediately before each $session->login(…) method call is executed. This type of hook is especially useful for modifying arguments before they are sent to the method.

$this->addHookBefore('Session::login', function(HookEvent $event) {
  // Get the object the event occurred on, if needed
  $session = $event->object;

  // Get values of arguments sent to hook (and optionally modify them)
  $name = $event->arguments(0);
  $pass = $event->arguments(1);
  $force = $event->arguments(2);

  /* Your code here, perhaps modifying arguments */

  // Populate back arguments (if you have modified them)
  $event->arguments(0, $name);
  $event->arguments(1, $pass);
  $event->arguments(2, $force);
});

Hooking after

The 'after' hooks are called immediately after each $session->login(…) method call is executed. This type of hook is especially useful for modifying the value that was returned by the method call.

$this->addHookAfter('Session::login', function(HookEvent $event) {
  // Get the object the event occurred on, if needed
  $session = $event->object;

  // An 'after' hook can retrieve and/or modify the return value
  $return = $event->return;

  // Get values of arguments sent to hook (if needed)
  $name = $event->arguments(0);
  $pass = $event->arguments(1);
  $force = $event->arguments(2);

  /* Your code here, perhaps modifying the return value */

  // Populate back return value, if you have modified it
  $event->return = $return;
});

$session methods and properties

API reference based on ProcessWire core version 3.0.163

Twitter updates

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    In the 332nd issue of ProcessWire Weekly we'll cover the latest core updates, introduce some new and updated ProcessWire resources, and more. Read on!
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